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False Freesia 'Alba'

Anomatheca laxa

Family: Iridaceae (eye-rid-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Anomatheca (an-oh-MATH-ee-kuh) (Info)
Species: laxa (LAKS-uh) (Info)
Cultivar: Alba
Synonym:Anomatheca cruenta
Synonym:Freesia laxa
Synonym:Lapeirousia cruenta
Synonym:Lapeirousia laxa



Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Where to Grow:

This plant is suitable for growing indoors


6-12 in. (15-30 cm)


3-6 in. (7-15 cm)


USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade


Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer




Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

From seed; sow indoors before last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds


This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Ben Lomond, California

Houston, Texas

Gardeners' Notes:


On Oct 15, 2006, dmj1218 from west Houston, TX (Zone 9a) wrote:

A pure white form of the species with no markings. Considered to be less hardy than Freesia laxa species so therefore probably only hardy in zones 9-10--definitely the least hardy and the last to bloom in my garden.

All of the Freesia laxa species and hybrids are unique and beautiful rarely grown spring blooming bulbs native to Africa; but are easily naturalized in southern gardens. Freesia laxa species has been in cultivation for 200 years, but is rarely seen in commerce today although is an extremely reliable tiny naturalized bulb in southern gardens. It blooms in February through March on 12 stalks going completely dormant by early summer in southeast Texas. It seems to not be bothered by moisture during its dormancy and provides a welcome respite from winter blandness. ... read more