Roundleaf Thoroughwort
Eupatorium rotundifolium

Family: Asteraceae (ass-ter-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Eupatorium (yoo-puh-TOR-ee-um) (Info)
Species: rotundifolium (ro-tun-dih-FOH-lee-um) (Info)

Category:

Perennials

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

Spacing:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Foliage:

Deciduous

Herbaceous

Other details:

This plant may be considered a protected species; check before digging or gathering seeds

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Self-sows freely; deadhead if you do not want volunteer seedlings next season

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Midway, Georgia

Richmond Hill, Georgia

Marietta, Mississippi

Wallkill, New York

Coatesville, Pennsylvania

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Aug 21, 2015, Rickwebb from Downingtown, PA wrote:

I just discovered this species growing wild in an open glade in Sadsbury Woods in southeast Pennsylvania. Some Highbush Blueberry shrubs were around and the soil must be acid there and it was full of boulders and rocks. These plants were not large growing specimens and they were scattered. This species is native from Maine into Florida and inland up into Missouri and the Ohio Valley. It grows in dry to medium moisture soils and needs some full sun. The white fuzzy-looking flowers have no ray petals. It is a good pollinator perennial like its other Boneset or Thoroughwort species members. Some native nurseries sell seed or even plants. (The first photo in this file is not this species; I don't know what it is with sharp petals.)