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PlantFiles: False Freesia
Anomatheca laxa 'East of Eden'

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Family: Iridaceae (eye-rid-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Anomatheca (an-oh-MATH-ee-kuh) (Info)
Species: laxa (LAKS-uh) (Info)
Cultivar: East of Eden
Hybridized by David Fenwick

Synonym:Freesia laxa

Category:
Bulbs
Perennials

Height:
6-12 in. (15-30 cm)

Spacing:
3-6 in. (7-15 cm)
6-9 in. (15-22 cm)

Hardiness:
USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)
USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)
USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)
USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)
USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)
USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

Sun Exposure:
Full Sun
Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:
Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:
Violet/Lavender

Bloom Time:
Mid Spring

Foliage:
Deciduous
Herbaceous

Other details:
Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater
Self-sows freely; deadhead if you do not want volunteer seedlings next season
Suitable for growing in containers

Soil pH requirements:
6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)
6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)
7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:
Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:
By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)
From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:
Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds
Seed does not store well; sow as soon as possible

Profile:

No positives
1 neutral
No negatives

Gardeners' Notes:

RatingAuthorContent
Neutral dmj1218 On Oct 15, 2006, dmj1218 from west Houston, TX (Zone 9a) wrote:

Lilac flowers with darker splotches; the result of a Freesia laxa backcross.

All of the Freesia laxa species and hybrids are unique and beautiful rarely grown spring blooming bulbs native to Africa; but are easily naturalized in southern gardens. Freesia laxa species has been in cultivation for 200 years, but is rarely seen in commerce today although is an extremely reliable tiny naturalized bulb in southern gardens. It blooms in February through March on 12 stalks going completely dormant by early summer in southeast Texas. It seems to not be bothered by moisture during its dormancy and provides a welcome respite from winter blandness. This underused little beauty is a rapid reproducer and is undergoing a resurgence in popularity due to its easygoing cultural requirements and myriad of hybridizing possibilities.



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