Photo by Melody

PlantFiles: Downy Wood Mint, Ohio Horsemint, Downy Pagoda-Plant
Blephilia ciliata

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Family: Lamiaceae (lay-mee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Blephilia (bleh-FIL-ee-uh) (Info)
Species: ciliata (sil-ee-ATE-uh) (Info)

One vendor has this plant for sale.

5 members have or want this plant for trade.

Category:
Herbs

Height:
18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Spacing:
12-15 in. (30-38 cm)

Hardiness:
USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)
USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)
USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)
USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)
USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)
USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)
USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)
USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)
USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)
USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:
Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:
N/A

Bloom Color:
Blue-Violet

Bloom Time:
Late Spring/Early Summer
Mid Summer

Foliage:
Herbaceous
Aromatic

Other details:
Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater
May be a noxious weed or invasive
This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds
Flowers are fragrant

Soil pH requirements:
6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)
7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:
Non-patented

Propagation Methods:
From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall
From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse
From seed; stratify if sowing indoors

Seed Collecting:
Collect seedhead/pod when flowers fade; allow to dry
Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

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to view:

By jg48650
Thumbnail #1 of Blephilia ciliata by jg48650

By Meredith79
Thumbnail #2 of Blephilia ciliata by Meredith79

By greenthumb99
Thumbnail #3 of Blephilia ciliata by greenthumb99

Profile:

No positives
2 neutrals
No negatives

Gardeners' Notes:

RatingAuthorContent
Neutral smiln32 On Aug 31, 2001, smiln32 from Oklahoma City, OK (Zone 7a) wrote:

Ohio horsemint is a Missouri native perennial which occurs in dryish open woods and thickets, clearings, fields and roadsides in the eastern 2/3 of the State. A clump-forming, mint family member that features mostly unbranched, square stems which rise to 30" tall. Blue-purple, two-lipped flowers appear in late spring to mid-summer in several tiered, whorled, globular clusters in an interrupted terminal spike, with each cluster being subtended by (resting upon) a whorl of fringed bracts. Similar in appearance to the closely related monardas. Lanceolate stem leaves are sessile, lightly-toothed, whitish-downy below and mildly fragrant when crushed. Leaves are usually considered to be lacking in the pungency and quality needed for use as a culinary herb. Small basal leaves and shoots remain green throughout the winter.

Neutral mystic On Aug 30, 2001, mystic from Ewing, KY (Zone 6a) wrote:

This mint is not as aromatic as other mints but,it attracts butterflies and bees to the garden. The plant stands about 2 feet tall the stems are branched opposite.The leaves are light green,whitish downy underneath.The flowers are blue to purple. Flowers bloom from May thru September.The young shoots are edible.Gather flowers and leaves in bloom, dry for later herb use.The aromatic leaves,like peppermint, can be prepared like those of true mints but I don't think it has the culinary use as much as other mints.

Regional...

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Arcola, Illinois
Pinconning, Michigan
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Olive Branch, Mississippi
Hudson, New Hampshire
Cape May, New Jersey
Oxford, Ohio
Leesburg, Virginia
Hancock, Wisconsin



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