False Indigo
Baptisia bracteata

Family: Papilionaceae (pa-pil-ee-uh-NAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Baptisia (bap-TIS-ee-uh) (Info)
Species: bracteata (brak-tee-AY-tuh) (Info)

Category:

Perennials

Height:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Spacing:

15-18 in. (38-45 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 C (-40 F)

USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 C (-35 F)

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Foliage:

Blue-Green

Other details:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; sow indoors before last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Jacksonville, Florida

Hulbert, Oklahoma

Dike, Texas

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
2
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Apr 21, 2009, Allwild from North, TX wrote:

Also Known As Plains Wild Indigo grows wild here. It is a very attractive low growing plant. Texas native. Apparently the roots can grow to 6ft long.

Text states that the Pawnee Indians treated colic by rubbing a mixture of pulverized wild indigo seeds and bison fat on the abdomen.

Neutral

On Jan 4, 2007, frostweed from Josephine, Arlington, TX (Zone 8a) wrote:

False Indigo Baptisia bracteata is Native to Texas and other States.

Neutral

On Aug 31, 2001, smiln32 from Oklahoma City, OK (Zone 7a) wrote:

This Missouri native features erect, branching stems of alternate, trifoliate leaves growing to 30" high with racemes of creamy white, pea-like flowers resembling lupines in shape. Flowers give way to blackish, showy seed pods which are attractive in dried flower arrangements. Found in the wild throughout Missouri in dry, open woods and prairies