Rhaphidophora
Rhaphidophora tetrasperma

Family: Araceae (a-RAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Rhaphidophora (ra-fid-OH-for-a) (Info)
Species: tetrasperma (tet-ra-SPERM-a) (Info)

Category:

Vines and Climbers

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Suitable for growing in containers

This plant is suitable for growing indoors

Height:

Unknown - Tell us

Spacing:

Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

Sun Exposure:

Light Shade

Partial to Full Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Inconspicuous/none

Bloom Time:

Unknown - Tell us

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Shiny/Glossy-Textured

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From herbaceous stem cuttings

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Long Beach, California

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Feb 12, 2013, pniksch from Frisco, TX (Zone 8a) wrote:

Very tropical looking, easy to grow and propagate, along the same line as Scindapsis (pothos). Easier than a Monstera to keep looking nice- more, smaller leaves keep it looking full. It will get leggy and looks better if nipped back occasionally, (like any vining plant). Not sure why this plant isn't more commonly available.

Positive

On Mar 27, 2008, ExoticRainforest from Siloam Springs, AR wrote:

Although Rhaphidophora tetrasperma is distantly related to Monstera and Epipremnum species, there is no close relationship to Philodendron. An Asiatic aroid species, there are no Philodendron or Monstera species found naturally in Asia and no Rhaphidophora species found naturally in Mexico, Central America, South America and the Caribben. A member of the aroid tribe Monstereae, Rhaphidophora tetrasperma is a native of Thailand and Malaysia that was identified to science in 1893.

A shingle species, this one is rarely found as a terrestrial specimen but will climb to 15 meters (16 feet). The scientific description can now be found on the internet. Scientific information says it is rare in nature but growers know it will invade a greenhouse if allowed to climb without ... read more