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Littleleaf Boxwood, Japanese Boxwood
Buxus microphylla

Family: Buxaceae
Genus: Buxus (BUK-sus) (Info)
Species: microphylla (my-kro-FIL-uh) (Info)

Category:

Shrubs

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

Spacing:

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

All parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Smooth-Textured

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From softwood cuttings

From semi-hardwood cuttings

Allow cut surface to callous over before planting

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Fairburn, Georgia

Roslindale, Massachusetts

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
2
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Jul 5, 2009, abken from New Orleans, LA wrote:

Tiny axillary bloom creamy, fragrant, male & female, mid-spring, attractive to bees.

Positive

On Jan 10, 2003, lupinelover from Grove City, OH (Zone 6a) wrote:

The quintessential plant for topiary, it also is widely used to form knot gardens. Box is almost fool-proof, whether pruned to any shape, or allowed to assume its natural form.

Deer leave this plant alone, another great reason to grow it around the periphery of a garden.

Neutral

On Aug 31, 2001, Terry from Murfreesboro, TN (Zone 7a) wrote:

The species is rarely grown; usually cultivars are widely available. Slow growing shrubs are often planted much closer together than the recommended spacing, in order to form a compact hedge more quickly.