Japanese Cedar
Cryptomeria japonica 'Radicans'

Family: Cupressaceae (koo-press-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Cryptomeria (krip-toh-MER-ee-uh) (Info)
Species: japonica (juh-PON-ih-kuh) (Info)
Cultivar: Radicans

Category:

Shrubs

Trees

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

30-40 ft. (9-12 m)

Spacing:

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Handling plant may cause skin irritation or allergic reaction

Pollen may cause allergic reaction

Bloom Color:

Inconspicuous/none

Bloom Time:

N/A

Foliage:

Evergreen

Aromatic

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

By air layering

By tip layering

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Atlanta, Georgia

Raleigh, North Carolina

Basye, Virginia

Langley, Washington

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Oct 22, 2007, lpdrjk from Grove City, OH wrote:

I've seen some beautiful specimens of this plant in Florida and wanted the same effect here in Central OH. Given our abundant alkalinity I planted seven of these with plenty of sulfur added into the soil but apparently this was not enough (the pH didn't really budge). Solid sulfur should probably not be used underground.

It's necessary to more agressively acidify your soil to get this tree to do much more than sit there, slowly dying. I've been using a combination of ammonium sulfate (acidification and nitrogen) dug into the drip zone and a generous amount of solid sulfur dispersed onto the top surface (where incoming rain can be acidified and carried down into the soil) and have finally been getting a reasonable growth rate. Hopefully they'll really take off (they advert... read more