Sweet Amber, Tutsan, St. John's Wort
Hypericum androsaemum

Family: Clusiaceae
Genus: Hypericum (hy-PER-ee-kum) (Info)
Species: androsaemum (an-dro-SEE-mum) (Info)

Category:

Shrubs

Foliage Color:

Blue-Green

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Spacing:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 2a: to -45.5 C (-50 F)

USDA Zone 2b: to -42.7 C (-45 F)

USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 C (-40 F)

USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 C (-35 F)

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Bright Yellow

Bloom Time:

Mid Summer

Foliage:

Deciduous

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

From softwood cuttings

From semi-hardwood cuttings

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Atlanta, Georgia

Seattle, Washington (2 reports)

Shelton, Washington

Woodinville, Washington

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
1
negative
RatingContent
Positive

On Aug 26, 2012, Arden2 from Olympia, WA wrote:

Unsure of exact cultivar. ID'd from Google Images. Mine has bright chartreuse leaves, red berries turning to black in late August in W. WA. It has been civilized in my year. Gets water with the annuals.

Negative

On Feb 21, 2005, kennedyh from Churchill, Victoria
Australia (Zone 10a) wrote:

This is an attractive looking plant both in flower and fruit, but it can become a problem weed. Here in south-eastern Australia, it has escaped into the wild and is a major weed along creek edges and in wet forests.

Neutral

On May 2, 2002, Lilith from Durham
United Kingdom (Zone 8a) wrote:

In the centre of each yellow flower of this shrub is a prominent tuft of long stamens. The berries turn to red, then purplish black. Corrupted from French, the common name means 'all wholesome' and the leaves were widely used to treat wounds.