Loquat Oak

Quercus rhysophylla

Family: Fagaceae (fag-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Quercus (KWER-kus) (Info)
Species: rhysophylla
Synonym:Lithocarpus rotundatus

Category:

Trees

Foliage Color:

Blue-Green

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)

Spacing:

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Brown/Bronze

Cream/Tan

Inconspicuous/none

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Foliage:

Evergreen

Shiny/Glossy-Textured

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

4.6 to 5.0 (highly acidic)

5.1 to 5.5 (strongly acidic)

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Houston, Texas

Richmond, Texas

San Antonio, Texas (2 reports)

Spring, Texas

Gardeners' Notes:

3
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jun 28, 2013, vossner from Richmond, TX (Zone 9a) wrote:

This IS NOT a medium sized tree so research carefully and plan for proper planting location. This beautiful oak is an incredibly fast grower and will easily reach 60 ft. During our mild z9a winters it will stay mostly evergreen but in the event of temp extremes, hot or cold, the loquat oak will drop its leaves almost entirely. The first time we observed this I panicked, thinking I had lost the tree. Not so, it recuperated quickly. Does not like wet feet. I love this tree and highly recommend it.

Positive

On Jun 27, 2013, Nody from Nijmegen,
Netherlands wrote:

I planted a 60 cm Quercus rhysophylla 'Maya' in my zone 7b garden last fall. After a enduring winter and cold spring it lost all it's leafs eventually, but resprouted vigourasly when tempatures started to rise in may. Cultivar 'Maya' is very hardy and recommended for cooler climates.

Positive

On Apr 6, 2009, ceejaytown from The Woodlands, TX (Zone 9a) wrote:

This is a wonderful small to medium tall tree. Evergreen, with larger leaves that resemble a loquat, it maintains an attractive shape with little need for training. Mine was at least 20 feet tall and had been in the ground for perhaps five years (30 gallon when planted) when Hurricane Ike took it down. I highly recommend this tree. Great in smaller yards where many of the larger trees would overwhelm.

BACK TO TOP