Esther Staley Lilac
Syringa x hyacinthiflora 'Esther Staley'

Family: Oleaceae (oh-lee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Syringa (si-RING-gah) (Info)
Species: x hyacinthiflora (hy-uh-sin-ih-FLOR-uh) (Info)
Cultivar: Esther Staley
Hybridized by Clarke
Registered or introduced: 1949

Category:

Shrubs

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

Spacing:

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 C (-40 F)

USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 C (-35 F)

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Pink

Magenta (Pink-Purple)

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Foliage:

Deciduous

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

La Canada Flintridge, California

Cincinnati, Ohio

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Mar 28, 2015, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote:

This culitvar is widely claimed to have a low-chill winter dormancy requirement in comparison with other hyacinthiflora hybrids. If so, it would be better for planting in Z7/8, with the Descanso hybrids.

The Hyacinthiflora hybrids bloom about 10 days before the common lilacs, and are valuable for extending the lilac bloom season in a mixed planting.

They have the same delightful fragrance as common lilac. They are also shorter and tend to produce their flowers closer to nose level.

All are highly resistant to the powdery mildew and leaf phloem necrosis that often afflict common lilac. Some also have attractive reddish fall color.

All are descendents of crosses between S. vulgaris and S. oblata var dilatata.

Positive

On May 8, 2008, slyperso1 from Richland, MI (Zone 5b) wrote:

This shrub is a hybrid lilac with good cold
hardiness. The parents are S. oblata and S. vulgaris.
The foliage becomes bronze to purplish-red in the fall.