Gerbera Daisy, Transvaal Daisy, African Daisy, Barberton Daisy, Gerber Daisy
Gerbera jamesonii 'Giant Spinner Lemon & Cerise'

Family: Asteraceae (ass-ter-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Gerbera (GER-ber-a) (Info)
Species: jamesonii (jay-mess-OWN-ee-eye) (Info)
Cultivar: Giant Spinner Lemon & Cerise

Category:

Annuals

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Suitable for growing in containers

Height:

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

Spacing:

12-15 in. (30-38 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Pink

Coral/Apricot

Bloom Time:

Blooms repeatedly

Foliage:

Herbaceous

This plant is resistant to deer

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

From herbaceous stem cuttings

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Redlands, California

Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Piscataway, New Jersey

Brady, Washington

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Feb 11, 2011, PlantMatch from Brunswick, GA wrote:

The Spinner Gerbera is the largest plant and flower of all Gerberas. As you can see the flowers easily grow larger than an adult's hand. Does very well in containers but even better in the ground. Height can be 24-30" and 24 inches wide in the ground for Spinner series. Seeds are not true to type so not worth trying.

Currently the Patented plant is not available in the US anymore, but hopefully it can be brought back to market. All are tissue cultured starter plants. Out for 2011. :(