Umbrella Dracaena
Dianella ensifolia

Family: Xanthorrhoeaceae
Genus: Dianella (dy-an-NEL-uh) (Info)
Species: ensifolia (en-see-FOH-lee-uh) (Info)

Category:

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Spacing:

15-18 in. (38-45 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

Seed Collecting:

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen; clean and dry seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

San Diego, California

Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Gainesville, Florida

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Aug 23, 2010, natureguyfrog from San Diego, CA wrote:

First I would disagree completely with the photos displayed for this plant. It is far too often that plants sold in the nursery trade are given names that either are incomplete or completely wrong. The plants pictured are usually sold as Dianella tasmanica variegata. (I have my doubts about this name also.) To my knowledge there are two variegated forms out at this time. One has the white variegation as in these pictures and the other has vivid yellow variegation. Both grow in the same phormium-like manner as Dianella tasmanica. (Phomium is the common New Zealand Flax). There are distinct differences in the flowers and also they seem to be more tightly clumping with less of a tendancy to spread than D. tasmanica type form. They have leaves that are not near as tough or tall as tasmanica.... read more