Calibrachoa, Million Bells
Calibrachoa 'Superbells Apricot Punch'

Family: Solanaceae (so-lan-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Calibrachoa (kal-ih-bruh-KOE-uh) (Info)
Cultivar: Superbells Apricot Punch
Additional cultivar information:(PP19843, Superbells series, aka USCALI413-8)
Hybridized by Sakazaki
Registered or introduced: 2007

Category:

Annuals

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Water Requirements:

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

6-12 in. (15-30 cm)

Spacing:

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Coral/Apricot

Gold (Yellow-Orange)

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Mid Fall

Blooms repeatedly

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Velvet/Fuzzy-Textured

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

Patent Information:

Patented

Propagation Methods:

From herbaceous stem cuttings

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Richmond, Texas

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Mar 3, 2011, vossner from Richmond, TX (Zone 9a) wrote:

Calibrachoas are a new type of plants that sort of look like little Petunias, only they arent sticky, perk right back up after it rains, and stay compact and bushy even when stressed. Just 6 - 10 inches tall, long, long, trailing branches cascade over the sides of hanging baskets and other containers, and spread over flower beds. Vigorous, heat tolerant and disease resistant. Annual, except in zones 9 - 11. You dont have to deadhead old flowers or pinch back stems. Water only when the top of the soil feels dry. Too much water makes roots rot. Full sun. Fertilize once a month. Attract hummingbirds.