Hardy Fuchsia
Fuchsia magellanica var. molinae 'Alba'

Family: Onagraceae (on-uh-GRAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Fuchsia (FEW-she-uh) (Info)
Species: magellanica var. molinae
Cultivar: Alba
» View all varieties of Fuchsias

Category:

Shrubs

Foliage Color:

Blue-Green

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Suitable for growing in containers

This plant is suitable for growing indoors

Height:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

Spacing:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Pale Pink

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Mid Fall

Blooms repeatedly

Foliage:

Deciduous

Smooth-Textured

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From woody stem cuttings

From softwood cuttings

From semi-hardwood cuttings

From hardwood cuttings

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Amesti, California

Crescent City, California

Artondale, Washington

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jul 27, 2009, PedricksCorner from Freedom, CA (Zone 9b) wrote:

I have had one of these for over 25 years and it is still going strong! It has a thick trunk now with the most unusual bark. The hummingbirds just love it, because it gets SO big. I could swear they fight over it and the Lycioides nearby. I have even been experimenting with it as a clipped hedge and plan to try and see how it would do as a bonsai. I think the combination of the interesting bark, and the tiny little "dancing fairies" as my niece calls them, would make a good bonsai specimen.