Possum Haw Holly, Possumhaw, Deciduous Holly
Ilex decidua 'Miller City'

Family: Aquifoliaceae (a-kwee-foh-lee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Ilex (EYE-leks) (Info)
Species: decidua (dee-SID-yoo-uh) (Info)
Cultivar: Miller City
Hybridized by J. Bon Hartline
Registered or introduced: 1980

Category:

Shrubs

Trees

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Flowers are fragrant

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

Spacing:

12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Foliage:

Deciduous

Smooth-Textured

Provides winter interest

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.1 to 5.5 (strongly acidic)

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From softwood cuttings

From semi-hardwood cuttings

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; stratify if sowing indoors

From seed; direct sow after last frost

By grafting

By simple layering

Seed Collecting:

Remove fleshy coating on seeds before storing

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen; clean and dry seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Clermont, Kentucky

Georgetown, Kentucky

Louisville, Kentucky

Gardeners' Notes:

1
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0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Mar 26, 2012, jrtealjr from Harvest, AL wrote:

My grandmother, in North Florida, made a jelly from a similar red fruit she harvested from plants growing in a wet area in the woods. She called it may-haw jelly. Is this the same plant and are the fruit edible?