Braun's Rock Cress
Arabis perstellata

Family: Brassicaceae (brass-ih-KAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Arabis (AR-uh-biss) (Info)
Species: perstellata (per-stel-AH-tuh) (Info)

Category:

Perennials

Height:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Spacing:

12-15 in. (30-38 cm)

15-18 in. (38-45 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Sun Exposure:

Light Shade

Partial to Full Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Other details:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

This plant may be considered a protected species; check before digging or gathering seeds

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Sep 7, 2001, Schmetterling from Louisville, KY (Zone 6a) wrote:

THIS PLANT IS ENDANGERED!

Both varieties of Arabis perstellata E.L. Braun, (Arabis perstellata E. L. Braun var. ampla Rollins, large rock cress, and Arabis perstellata E.L. Braun var. perstellata Fernald, small rock cress) are perennial members of the mustard family (Brassicaceae). The large rock cress is known from only one county in Tennessee, and the small rock cress is known from only three counties in Kentucky. Both varieties have round stems and alternate leaves. Their stems and foliage have a grayish coloration due to the large quantity of hairs. Their stems arise from horizontal bases and grow up to 80 centimeters (cm) (31.5 inches) long, often drooping from rock ledges. Each year a basal rosette of leaves is produced, and new flowering branches emerge from the old r... read more