Alpine Catchfly
Lychnis alpina

Family: Caryophyllaceae (kar-ree-oh-fil-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Lychnis (LIK-niss) (Info)
Species: alpina (AL-pin-a) (Info)
Synonym:Viscaria alpina
Synonym:Agrostemma alpina
Synonym:Lychnis fulgida
Synonym:Lychnis helvetica
Synonym:Lychnis suecica

Category:

Alpines and Rock Gardens

Height:

under 6 in. (15 cm)

Spacing:

6-9 in. (15-22 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Rose/Mauve

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Smooth-Textured

Other details:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

7.9 to 8.5 (alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; sow indoors before last frost

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Seward, Alaska

Parker, Colorado

Leesburg, Virginia

Kalama, Washington

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jun 22, 2004, jhyshark from Scottville, MI (Zone 4b) wrote:

I loved this beautiful plant for its bright blossom and then the very interesting seed pods, but alas, it only survived for 2 years. It would be great to get another one, and learn how to keep it happy, although it might be a tad cold where I am. The maps say I'm in zone 5, but the plants say zone 4. (zip code 49454)

Positive

On Aug 12, 2003, meisterdon1 wrote:

This very beautiful flower appeared where a wildflower mixture was sown in my Saskatchewan garden. The seed pods formed as small upright open-topped gourds shaped much like a cow cockle seed pod. When the seeds were shiny black and loose in the pods I simply turned each pod upside down in a small plastic bag and shook it, letting the seed fall in to the bag. The plant yielded almost a tablespoon full of seed!

Now the trick will be to discover what germination regime works best for this plant.