Strawberry
Fragaria x ananassa 'Loran'

Family: Rosaceae (ro-ZAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Fragaria (frag-AY-ree-uh) (Info)
Species: x ananassa (a-NAN-ass-uh) (Info)
Cultivar: Loran
» View all varieties of Strawberries

Category:

Edible Fruits and Nuts

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Suitable for growing in containers

Height:

6-12 in. (15-30 cm)

Spacing:

15-18 in. (38-45 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Rose/Mauve

Magenta (Pink-Purple)

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Foliage:

Unknown - Tell us

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Boothbay Harbor, Maine

Norristown, Pennsylvania

Spring, Texas

Winnsboro, Texas

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jul 4, 2011, stormyla from Norristown, PA (Zone 6b) wrote:

This is by far the most beautiful of strawberry plants that I have ever grown. The blooms start out white or cream and change to deep vivid magenta. The plant bears fruit continuously all summer. So far the fruits have been quite small, but that may be due to the very small container they are growing in. I will change the container and see if that improves. The berries are very sweet but a bit seedy at their small size.