Vanilla Leaf, Deer Foot
Achlys triphylla

Family: Berberidaceae (bear-ber-id-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Achlys (AK-liss) (Info)
Species: triphylla (try-FIL-uh) (Info)

Category:

Groundcovers

Perennials

Height:

6-12 in. (15-30 cm)

Spacing:

15-18 in. (38-45 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 C (-40 F)

USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 C (-35 F)

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

Sun Exposure:

Partial to Full Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Herbaceous

Aromatic

Other details:

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Flowers are fragrant

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Grants Pass, Oregon

Salem, Oregon

Bremerton, Washington

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
3
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Feb 15, 2005, melody from Benton, KY (Zone 7a) wrote:

Pairs of low, slender stalks growing in patches. One stalk is the petiole, the other is a narrow stalk topped with a spike of small white flowers.

It's range is from British Columbia south through the coast ranges of northern California.

Neutral

On Aug 31, 2004, smiln32 from Oklahoma City, OK (Zone 7a) wrote:

This plant is quite drought tolerant. Spring flowering with bottlebrush like flowers, the main interest in this plant are the leaves. When fresh the leaves are not fragrant. When picked and dried, then crushed, a sweet aroma is released. This is only advisable to do if you have a large clump. Otherwise one can quickly diminish the plant to the point of no return.

On the USDA's Plants Database web site, there is a note that it is also called "Sweet after death".

Neutral

On Sep 13, 2001, Terry from Murfreesboro, TN (Zone 7a) wrote:

A native woodland groundcover, the dried leaves have a distinctive vanilla fragrance. Blooms May-June with white, mist-like flowers.