Black Poplar
Populus nigra

Family: Salicaceae (sal-i-KAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Populus (POP-yoo-lus) (Info)
Species: nigra (NY-gruh) (Info)

Category:

Trees

Height:

over 40 ft. (12 m)

Spacing:

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

30-40 ft. (9-12 m)

over 40 ft. (12 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Red

Orange

Pale Green

Inconspicuous/none

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Foliage:

Deciduous

Shiny/Glossy-Textured

Leathery-Textured

Other details:

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

This plant may be considered a protected species; check before digging or gathering seeds

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From woody stem cuttings

From hardwood cuttings

From hardwood heel cuttings

From seed; direct sow after last frost

From seed; germinate in a damp paper towel

From seed; germinate in vitro in gelatin, agar or other medium

By simple layering

By stooling or mound layering

Seed Collecting:

Bag seedheads to capture ripening seed

Seed does not store well; sow as soon as possible

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
0
neutrals
1
negative
RatingContent
Negative

On Jul 15, 2015, Rickwebb from Downingtown, PA wrote:

I have never seen this European species in the Eastern or Midwestern USA. The Lombardy Popular, a narrow columnar cultivar, was once common, but died from canker disease when about 15 years old in the humid East and has been discontinued. The Lombardy does alright out in the drier West. The native Cottonwoods are better for North America than this European plant. There are some hybrids of Cottonwood x Black Popular offered by cheap mail order nurseries as growing even faster than either species, but I don't think they are worth it. 4 to 5 feet/year is fast enough. The hybrids will be a little more weak wooded due to faster growth.