Sea Oats
Uniola paniculata

Family: Poaceae (poh-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Uniola (yoo-nee-OH-luh) (Info)
Species: paniculata (pan-ick-yoo-LAY-tuh) (Info)

Category:

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Height:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

Spacing:

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Cream/Tan

Bloom Time:

Blooms all year

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Other details:

May be a noxious weed or invasive

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

This plant may be considered a protected species; check before digging or gathering seeds

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Big Pine Key, Florida

Boca Raton, Florida

Bradenton, Florida

Cape Canaveral, Florida

Lake Worth, Florida

Satellite Beach, Florida

Venice, Florida

De Leon, Texas

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Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jul 25, 2004, MotherNature4 from Bartow, FL (Zone 9a) wrote:

Because of their beauty, Sea Oats have been overharvested in the past. They are strictly protected now because their rhizomatous growth habit protects our Florida beaches and dunes.

Neutral

On Oct 12, 2001, Floridian from Lutz, FL (Zone 9b) wrote:

Sea oats is a handsome ornamental grass, at its best in cultivated beds placed where its nodding seedheads can draw attention. Sea oats is tolerant of salt spray and saline soils. It is, however, invasive, spreading by rhizomes, but easy to cut back and well worth the effort.

The mature seedheads are very decorative and commonly used in dried floral arrangements. Sea oats is often used in dune stabilization programs because its extensive system of underground stems and roots helps reduce erosion. The dried and cooked seeds are said to make a flavorful cereal.

Wild sea oats is protected in Florida and Georgia (and probably other states as well), not because it is endangered or threatened, but because it performs a valuable ecological service by stabilizing sa... read more