Pink Powder Puff
Calliandra riparia

Family: Mimosaceae
Genus: Calliandra (kal-ee-AN-druh) (Info)
Species: riparia (rip-AR-ee-uh) (Info)
Synonym:Calliandra schultzei

Category:

Shrubs

Height:

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

Spacing:

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Pale Pink

Pink

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Late Summer/Early Fall

Mid Fall

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Other details:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Lutz, Florida

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
2
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Oct 23, 2009, movewithmel from Houston, TX wrote:

I bought this plant about a year ago, and it has never bloomed. It has grown a lot, and we like the look of it as a shrub in one of our sunny beds, but I don't know why it won't give us those beautiful pink flowers. Is it an age thing? I think I bought it in a one-gallon container, but other than that, I have no idea how old it is. It's about five feet high, and even more wide, and we do trim it back from time to time, mainly to back it off our driveway. Any insight on how to get it to bloom would be appreciated.

Neutral

On Nov 12, 2001, Floridian from Lutz, FL (Zone 9b) wrote:

This oriental looking shrub has a tendency to grow more horizontally than vertically. It has cascading branches and powder puff white/pink flowers. The flowers are mimosa-like "powderpuffs". Each flower opens for a single night to display showy filaments, which usually are white at the very base and red at the tip (although they may be pink). By the next day, the filaments have wilted, and unfertilized flowers drop.