We want to hear from you! Please take this short, anonymous survey to help us improve the DG home page.

Chinese Hat, Cup and Saucer, Parasol Flower

Holmskioldia sanguinea

Family: Lamiaceae (lay-mee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Holmskioldia (holm-skee-OL-dee-uh) (Info)
Species: sanguinea (san-GWIN-ee-a) (Info)
Synonym:Hastingia coccinea
Synonym:Hastingia scandens
Synonym:Holmskioldia rubra
Synonym:Platunum rubrum


Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us


8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)


4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)


USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade


Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:



Bright Yellow

Bloom Time:

Late Summer/Early Fall

Mid Fall

Late Fall/Early Winter

Mid Winter




Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:


Propagation Methods:

From woody stem cuttings

From hardwood cuttings

By simple layering

By air layering

By tip layering

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds


This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

San Marino, California

Bartow, Florida

Bonita Springs, Florida

Bradenton, Florida

Delray Beach, Florida

Homestead, Florida

Lake Alfred, Florida

Miami, Florida (2 reports)

Mulberry, Florida

Safety Harbor, Florida

Saint Petersburg, Florida

Thonotosassa, Florida

Winter Haven, Florida

Savannah, Georgia

Thibodaux, Louisiana

Los Fresnos, Texas

Santa Fe, Texas

show all

Gardeners' Notes:


On Sep 22, 2014, giegertree from Savannah, GA wrote:

Chinese hat is a hardy herbaceous perennial in Zone 8 in Georgia and coastal South Carolina. Killed back by frost annually, it bounces back with lush growth and will begin to flower by November (before the next killing frost will soon arrive).


On Feb 10, 2014, amygirl from Miami, FL wrote:

In south Florida, they begin flowering in November and continue through April....our dry season. Hummingbirds love this plant. Be careful, each branch touching the ground will take root. It is very difficult to totally remove from an area once it has become well established.


On Apr 28, 2011, adam7twiddle from Dallas, TX (Zone 8a) wrote:

I planted it in the ground in a protected area against a house and mulched is very well. It came back from the roots after an especially cold winter even for zone 8. I'm not sure if it will grow fast enough to flower before the growing season is over.


On Jan 27, 2011, bkacker from Pompano Beach, FL (Zone 10b) wrote:

I don't personally grow this but found a link for some information for Missverdasunshine. http://floridagardener.com/pom/holmskioldias.htm

Hope this answers your questions. How are your plants doing?


On Oct 28, 2010, Mackaysterbelle from Lake Alfred, FL wrote:

Holmskioldia sanguinea grows in several locations within Mackay Gardens and Lakeside Preserve in Lake Alfred, Florida. The plants are found around the small pool, Grotto, and Arbor. The Gardens are free and open to the public. The bushes grow in part shade and full sun and bloom prolifically with no added fertilizers or irrigation.


On Oct 13, 2010, missverdasunshi from Jocotepec, Jalisco
Mexico wrote:

I live in central Mx., in a zone similar to #24 in Sunset Western Garden book. I have numerous Chinese Hat plants but have only had them for several months. They are spectacular now but am curious re: how long they will bloom.. Have had no luck locating information on the net or with local neighbors. Any info regarding their care, fertilizing,pruning, etc. will be most welcome. As glorious as they are I'm surprized they aren't everywhere. The nurseries here are not helpful with info. They simply buy off trucks from Cuernavaca.

Thanks in advance.



On Jan 15, 2004, MotherNature4 from Bartow, FL (Zone 9a) wrote:

This colorful shrub is in full bloom in central Florida in December and January. Graceful, arching branches will have clusters of flowers and bracts at every leaf node for 10 ft. or more. It blooms best in full sun, and needs to be watered only in times of drought.
Branches should be pruned back to the ground rather than cut off midway. This shrub will grow to 30 ft. if not pruned.
It is much loved by Hummingbirds and butterflies.