Kentucky Viburnum, Softleaf Arrowwood
Viburnum molle

Family: Adoxaceae (a-dox-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Viburnum (vy-BUR-num) (Info)
Species: molle (MAW-ley) (Info)
Synonym:Viburnum ozarkense

Category:

Shrubs

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

Spacing:

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Foliage:

Deciduous

Smooth-Textured

Good Fall Color

Provides winter interest

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From softwood cuttings

From semi-hardwood cuttings

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

From seed; stratify if sowing indoors

From seed; sow indoors before last frost

Seed Collecting:

Remove fleshy coating on seeds before storing

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen; clean and dry seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Elburn, Illinois

Lisle, Illinois

Clermont, Kentucky

Georgetown, Kentucky

Louisville, Kentucky

Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts

Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jun 26, 2015, Rickwebb from Downingtown, PA wrote:

I just discovered this fine shrub in the Midwest Collection in Morton Arboretum in Lisle, Illinois. It is a very similar species to the commonly planted Smooth or Southern Arrowwood Viburnum, V. dentatum. Looks good!

Positive

On Jan 28, 2006, ViburnumValley from Scott County, KY (Zone 5b) wrote:

Kentucky viburnum is a fine native plant in the viburnum clan which looks and acts a lot like the arrowwood viburnum (V. dentatum). The main difference is the dark papery exfoliating bark, exhibited on plants from a relatively young age. One might mistake it for a dead stem; don't!

This is not a common plant, but I'm quite interested in propagating and promoting it to diversify the types of plants used in the everyday garden. It is found in the woodland understory on limestone soils, and the photos I've posted illustrate some pretty spare growing environments. Kentucky viburnum seems to be pretty tough.