Oconee Azalea, Piedmont Azalea
Rhododendron flammeum

Family: Ericaceae (er-ek-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Rhododendron (roh-do-DEN-dron) (Info)
Species: flammeum (FLAM-ee-um) (Info)
Synonym:Azalea speciosa
Synonym:Rhododendron speciosum
» View all varieties of Azaleas and Rhododendrons

Category:

Shrubs

Height:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Spacing:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Sun Exposure:

Light Shade

Danger:

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Pink

Coral/Apricot

Pale Yellow

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Mid Spring

Foliage:

Deciduous

Other details:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Flowers are fragrant

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Marietta, Georgia

Elizabeth City, North Carolina

Downingtown, Pennsylvania

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
2
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jan 15, 2014, Rickwebb from Downingtown, PA wrote:

Like other Deciduous Azaleas, the Oconee, originally from Georgia and South Carolina, is a high quality, neat, clean plant, that is somewhat expensive to buy. I bought one at a native plant nursery in 2003 in se PA and mine has been doing well in the good quality clay soil that is just slightly acid. Its flower color ranges from yellow to orange to salmon to orangish-red. It gets some fall color that is alright, usually orangish. The stout stems also look good. Evergreen Azaleas with the tiny leaves, thin stems, and bushy habit from East Asia, that are sort of cheap to buy, are great as florist plants, but not so great as landscape plants, as they get straggly.

Neutral

On Oct 18, 2007, htop from San Antonio, TX (Zone 8b) wrote:

I have not grown this plant. This species is a native shrub of the Piedmont region of Georgia and South Carolina. It has varying bloom shapes and colors.

Neutral

On Aug 4, 2002, smiln32 from Oklahoma City, OK (Zone 7a) wrote:

The Oconee Azalea, also known as Rhododendron speciosum, is possibly the most variable of all the native azaleas, with the flowers of seed grown plants ranging from salmon and strong pink to yellow to orange to red. It varies from low mounding shrubs to plants six feet or more in height. The non-fragrant flowers are produced in early to mid-April, following Piedmont azalea and before the Swamp azalea and the Alabama azalea. (From Lazy K Nursery's Garden Delights web site)