Zigzag Spiderwort
Tradescantia subaspera

Family: Commelinaceae (ko-mel-ih-NAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Tradescantia (trad-es-KAN-tee-uh) (Info)
Species: subaspera (sub-AS-per-uh) (Info)

Category:

Perennials

Foliage Color:

Dark/Black

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Spacing:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Sun Exposure:

Partial to Full Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Violet/Lavender

Purple

Bloom Time:

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

From seed; stratify if sowing indoors

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Beatrice, Nebraska

Greenville, South Carolina

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Mar 18, 2002, Terry from Murfreesboro, TN (Zone 7a) wrote:

The stems form in a zig-zag pattern; hence the common name. Broad, dark green foliage (looks almost like iris leaves) help differentiate this plant from T. virginiana.

The species is tolerant of poor soils, and may self-seed too freely in ideal conditions. The foliage starts to look pretty rough after flowering; it should be cut back (to the ground) after blooming to encourage new growth, and possibly a second flush of blooms in the fall.