Squirrel Corn, Turkey Corn
Dicentra canadensis

Family: Papaveraceae (pa-pav-er-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Dicentra (dy-SEN-truh) (Info)
Species: canadensis (ka-na-DEN-sis) (Info)

Category:

Perennials

Foliage Color:

Blue-Green

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

6-12 in. (15-30 cm)

Spacing:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 C (-40 F)

USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 C (-35 F)

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Light Shade

Danger:

All parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Handling plant may cause skin irritation or allergic reaction

Bloom Color:

Pale Pink

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

From seed; sow indoors before last frost

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Bag seedheads to capture ripening seed

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

,

Madison, Alabama

Warren, Indiana

Pinconning, Michigan

Minneapolis, Minnesota

Buffalo, New York

Panama, New York

Glouster, Ohio

Viola, Tennessee

Leesburg, Virginia

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Apr 12, 2011, Erutuon from Minneapolis, MN wrote:

I bought this on eBay from a seller in West Virginia alas, probably dug from the wild. I received ten or so little tubers, which I sprinkled around our shady backyard. They aren't big enough to bloom yet, but they send up single small, finely-divided leaves every spring, nearly identical to Dutchman's breeches leaves, which wither in summer. Perhaps they will bloom next year.