Daylily
Hemerocallis 'Frans Hals'

Family: Hemerocallidaceae (hem-er-oh-kal-id-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Hemerocallis (hem-er-oh-KAL-iss) (Info)
Cultivar: Frans Hals
Hybridized by Flory
Registered or introduced: 1955
» View all varieties of Daylilies

Height:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Spacing:

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 C (-40 F)

USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 C (-35 F)

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

Bloom Time:

Late Midseason (MLa)

Flower Size:

Large (more than 4.5" diameter)

Blooming Habit:

Diurnal (diu.)

Flower Type:

Single

Bloom Color:

Red-Orange

Gold (Yellow-Orange)

Color Patterns:

Bicolor

Flower Fragrance:

No fragrance

Foliage Habit:

Dormant (dor.)

Ploidy:

Diploid

Awards (if applicable):

Honorable Mention

Junior Citation

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Dothan, Alabama

Glen Avon, California

Sacramento, California

Yosemite Lakes, California

Waterbury, Connecticut

Trenton, Florida

Cordele, Georgia

Eastport, Idaho

Belleville, Illinois

Davis Junction, Illinois

Hampton, Illinois

Moline, Illinois

Normal, Illinois

Oak Lawn, Illinois

Logansport, Indiana

Solsberry, Indiana

Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Sioux Center, Iowa

Barbourville, Kentucky

Ewing, Kentucky

Lancaster, Kentucky

Lake Charles, Louisiana

Abbot, Maine

Calais, Maine

Lebanon, Maine

Gaithersburg, Maryland

Silver Spring, Maryland

Florence, Massachusetts

Marlborough, Massachusetts

Grand Rapids, Michigan

Ocean Springs, Mississippi

Auburn, New Hampshire

Greenville, New Hampshire

Munsonville, New Hampshire

Sandown, New Hampshire

Freehold, New Jersey

Albuquerque, New Mexico

Crown Point, New York

Elba, New York

Nineveh, New York

Orchard Park, New York

Syracuse, New York

Elizabeth City, North Carolina

Morehead City, North Carolina

Coshocton, Ohio

Felicity, Ohio

North Ridgeville, Ohio

Oregon, Ohio

Hulbert, Oklahoma

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Allentown, Pennsylvania

Pocono Lake, Pennsylvania

Tunkhannock, Pennsylvania

Columbia, South Carolina

North Augusta, South Carolina

Vidor, Texas

Edison, Washington

Kalama, Washington

Marion, Wisconsin

River Falls, Wisconsin

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

7
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jun 24, 2008, lilybell2 from Tunkhannock, PA wrote:

First bloom appeared 6/24, which in zone 5 is early; ML bloom time is questionable. Lovely plant!

Positive

On Jun 28, 2007, JonthanJ from Logansport, IN wrote:

When Wilmer Flory registered Frans Hals, naming it for the painter, it was the first serious bicolored daylily. Its continuing availability measures just how serious that is. Personally I like the way the scapes are so branchy that well grown clumps do a display that looks like curled ribbons rather than emphasizing the single blossoms.

Positive

On Oct 29, 2006, Sherlock221 from Lancaster, KY wrote:

I was given this daylily by a friend -- what a nice surprise when it bloomed! It was tiny when I got it and had been out of the ground for some time, but recovered quickly and has grown fast. The warm colors are lovely and make a bright spot in the garden. I've seen this used in a large grouping in front of a restaurant, which was very impressive. I have also seen the name of this daylily spelled Franz Hall or Franz Hals. I'm not sure what the correct name actually is. In any case, I recommend this lily for anyone's garden. Very nice.

Positive

On Aug 28, 2006, buckeyefan from Davis Junction, IL (Zone 5a) wrote:

A beautiful daylily which bloomed here from Mid June to Mid August. This daylily is a must for every daylily garden (IMHO).

Positive

On Aug 18, 2005, RobD_SC from Columbia, SC (Zone 8a) wrote:

Frans Hals is one of my favorite daylilies. The blooms are beautiful one day, and delicious in salads or right off the plant the next day. I even read that daylily buds and blooms are more nutritious than broccoli. Who knew?

Positive

On May 17, 2005, Gindee77 from Hampton, IL (Zone 5a) wrote:

This daylily blooms all the time and is hardy and healthy in my zone 5 garden.

Neutral

On Nov 27, 2004, smiln32 from Oklahoma City, OK (Zone 7a) wrote:

A bright cinnamon and rich apricot bicolor. With up to 50 buds, very long blooming. Reaches a height of 24". Does better in cooler climates. Tolerates most soil conditions. Some sources list this plant as an heirloom daylily. Divide in spring. For best results, water frequently from spring until the buds appear and apply a balanced liquid fertilizer every 2-3 weeks.

Positive

On Nov 24, 2004, AlicemayS from Florence, MA (Zone 5a) wrote:

A nice small sized daylily - easy to handle when having to divide. Prolific bloomer - a bright little sunny spot with two tone persimmon/yellow petals. Blooms Mid July to Mid August on 34" scapes in zone 5a Florence, MA.