Photo by Melody

PlantFiles: Tomato
Lycopersicon lycopersicum 'Sunray'

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Family: Solanaceae (so-lan-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Lycopersicon (ly-koh-PER-see-kon) (Info)
Species: lycopersicum (ly-koh-PER-see-kum) (Info)
Cultivar: Sunray
Registered or introduced: 1950

» View all varieties of Tomatoes

2 vendors have this plant for sale.

2 members have or want this plant for trade.

Height:
4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

Spacing:
36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

Sun Exposure:
Full Sun

Danger:
Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Seed Collecting:
Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Growing Habit:
Indeterminate

Fruit Shape:
Standard

Fruit Size:
Medium (under one pound)

Days to Maturity:
Mid (69-80 days)

Fruit Colors:
Gold

Seed Type:
Open-pollinated

Usage:
Fresh, slicing
Canning

Disease Resistance:
Fusarium Wilt (F)

Leaf Type:
Regular Leaf

Profile:

1 positive
No neutrals
1 negative

Gardeners' Notes:

RatingAuthorContent
Negative Farmerdill On Jan 10, 2004, Farmerdill from Augusta, GA (Zone 8a) wrote:

Sunray is a cross between Jubilee and Pan American. Supposedly an improved Jubilee but in any event, I tried them in the 50's and early 60's and had difficulty differentiating between them. They are as prolific as any OP and yes they are uniform and blemish free. They have a consistency more like a paste tomato. For table use, I'll quote the old folks, " I wouldn't give you two cents with a hole in it" for either or both of them.

Positive macmex On Nov 25, 2002, macmex from Tahlequah, OK wrote:

This has been my favorite golden/yellow variety of tomato since 1983. My original seed came as a free gift from Parks Seed Co. and was labeled Sunray VF. I've never had a disease problem with this one. Sunray is prolific and, in 1983, when pitted against about 20 other tomato varieties, in a blind taste test with friends, usually came out on top. It is NOT a low acid tomato in spite of its' color.
Sunray is indeterminant, but not rampant in growth. It has good leaf cover. I prefer to stake it. But it does okay if left to sprawl, mulched with straw.
This is a prolific variety. Also, the fruit will last longer than most tomatoes. I harvested my last fruit, this year (2002) on Nov. 1. I'll process the last fruit from this picking today (Nov 25). They are still usable. This is not a beef steak variety. Fruit has standard tomato locules.

Regional...

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Troy, Virginia



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