Tomato
Lycopersicon lycopersicum 'Long Keeper'

Family: Solanaceae (so-lan-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Lycopersicon (ly-koh-PER-see-kon) (Info)
Species: lycopersicum (ly-koh-PER-see-kum) (Info)
Cultivar: Long Keeper
» View all varieties of Tomatoes

Height:

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

Spacing:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Seed Collecting:

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen; clean and dry seeds

Ferment seeds before storing

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Growing Habit:

Determinate

Fruit Shape:

Plum

Standard

Fruit Size:

Medium (under one pound)

Days to Maturity:

Mid (69-80 days)

Fruit Colors:

Red-orange

Red

Seed Type:

Open-pollinated

Usage:

Unknown - Tell us

Disease Resistance:

Unknown - Tell us

Leaf Type:

Regular Leaf

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Newark Valley, New York

Salem, Oregon

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
3
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Oct 1, 2009, rbrown974 from Newark Valley, NY wrote:

Burpee Longkeeper weighs 4-to-the-lb. They do not ripen on the vine in New York State (the growing season is too short). I pick them when the first frost is forecast (early October) and put them one-deep on a card table without touching each other in a dark, dry, cool location (65-68 degrees F.). At this point the skin is a green/yellow/pink. When ripe, the skin is yellow/orange, the flesh inside red, the meat in the center tends to be green. Many never do ripen. They rot while still green. For those that do ripen, if you wait too long to use them they develop tiny spots of rot. The majority of your Burpee Longkeepers will end up in the trash, not eaten at the table. A fraction, however, will be edible in mid-November. Acid flavor.

Neutral

On Apr 15, 2009, RussMartin4154 from Omaha, NE (Zone 5b) wrote:

Possibly also known as "Reverend Morrow's Long Keeper".

Neutral

On Mar 13, 2004, Farmerdill from Augusta, GA (Zone 8a) wrote:

Introduced by Burpee in 1979 and is best known for its keeping qualities. It has been reported to remain in edible condition after 5 months in storage. Of course that depends on your definition of edible. I have to be mighty hungry to eat them at any time in their life cycle.

Neutral

On Sep 27, 2002, jl84094 wrote:

If picked ripe in late fall and stored properly, tomatoes can last through the winter without a change in flavor or texture. Store un-wrapped on open shelves at 60 to 70 degrees F.