Japanese Persimmon, Oriental Persimmon, Sharon Fruit, Kaki
Diospyros kaki

Family: Ebenaceae (eb-en-NAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Diospyros (dy-oh-SPY-ros) (Info)
Species: kaki (KAH-kee) (Info)

Category:

Edible Fruits and Nuts

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

Spacing:

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 °C (0 °F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 °C (5 °F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 °C (10 °F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 °C (15 °F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 °C (20 °F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Pale Pink

Cream/Tan

Inconspicuous/none

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Foliage:

Deciduous

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By grafting

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Anniston, Alabama

Atmore, Alabama

Manhattan Beach, California

Washington, District Of Columbia

Rockledge, Florida

Satsuma, Florida

New Orleans, Louisiana

Brookeville, Maryland

Perkinston, Mississippi

Greenville, North Carolina

Arlington, Texas

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Nov 25, 2004, Thaumaturgist from Rockledge, FL (Zone 10a) wrote:

Persimmon, sometimes called Oriental Persimmon or
Japanese Persimmon is a native of possibly China,
and it comes from the Ebony Family, Ebenaceae.

Its scientific name of Diospyros kaki tells us
that it was good enough to be named the food of
the gods.

DIOS = gods SPYROS = wheat (food)

Persimmon nomenclatures however are full of
distorted or abbreviated Oriental, primarily
Japanese names, the original versions of which
were used to identify the plants when they were
imported into the US. Today, we have a number of
cultivars with Asiatic or pseudo-Asiatic names
and meanings, as well as some with truly American
names.

Here are some of the most com... read more

Positive

On Oct 17, 2003, Monocromatico from Rio de Janeiro
Brazil (Zone 11) wrote:

Japanese Persimon (or Kaki) is an apreciated fruit over here in Brazil. It has a sweet, but not strong taste. It looks like a tomato, and it´s peel is as thin as a tomato´s.

Nowadays, the fruits comercialized don´t have seeds, so it´s generally propagated by cuttings or graftings.