Toothed Spurge
Euphorbia dentata

Family: Euphorbiaceae (yoo-for-bee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Euphorbia (yoo-FOR-bee-uh) (Info)
Species: dentata (den-TAY-tuh) (Info)
Synonym:Poinsettia dentata

Category:

Annuals

Height:

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Spacing:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Hardiness:

Not Applicable

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

All parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Pale Yellow

Pale Green

Inconspicuous/none

Bloom Time:

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Smooth-Textured

Other details:

May be a noxious weed or invasive

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From herbaceous stem cuttings

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Yale, Iowa

Melbourne, Kentucky

Austin, Texas

Desoto, Texas

Fort Worth, Texas

San Antonio, Texas

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
1
neutral
1
negative
RatingContent
Negative

On Mar 10, 2012, LouC from Desoto, TX (Zone 8a) wrote:

One of the worst of the garden thugs. Been trying get rid of it for 45 years.

Neutral

On Jan 17, 2005, JodyC from Palmyra, IL (Zone 5b) wrote:

Native to USA
The flowers of spurges are occasionally visited by small bees, Syrphid flies, and wasps. The seeds are consumed by the Mourning Dove, Greater Prairie Chicken, and to a lesser extent by the Bobwhite and Horned Lark. Because the milky latex in the stems and foliage is poisonous, this plant is rarely consumed by mammalian herbivores.

Sometimes this plant is referred to as Euphorbia dentata. Toothed Spurge is closely related to Euphorbia cyathophora (Wild Poinsettia), which also occurs in Illinois. This latter species has shiny leaves that turn red at the base near the inflorescence; it is the showier of the two plants.