New Zealand Bur, Buzzy, Bidgee-Widgee

Acaena novae-zelandiae

Family: Rosaceae (ro-ZAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Acaena (a-SEE-na) (Info)
Species: novae-zelandiae (NO-vay zee-LAN-dee-ay) (Info)
Synonym:Acaena anserinifolia



Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us


under 6 in. (15 cm)


36-48 in. (90-120 cm)


USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade


Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:


Bloom Time:

Late Summer/Early Fall



Other details:

May be a noxious weed or invasive

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:


Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Gardeners' Notes:


On Jan 18, 2008, angelam from melbourne
Australia wrote:

This is not a plant you'd want to plant anywhere clothes or pets would come into regular contact with it. The hooks on the seed heads are incredibly efficient. But I needed something for the top of a bank, at the foot of a fence, inaccessible to everyone and where watering was impossible ( even when we are allowed to do so) and the local bush regeneration nursery suggested it. It is a local plant and fed on by a number of local butterflies, but rarely planted. It's done a brilliant job, each plant has covered several square feet since planting in the Spring, with only the one watering at planting. We haven't had any rain for 3 weeks, several of the days since then have been over 100C and it's a lush green still when most plantsin my garded are suffering some stress and showing it.. <... read more


On Apr 2, 2003, kennedyh from Churchill, Victoria
Australia (Zone 10a) wrote:

This plant is famous in Australia as the first major weed that Australia has contributed to the rest of the world!
The fruit are spheres of achenes, each with a hooked awn and the individual seeds easily attach themselves to your clothing and are spread far and wide. They are native in this area, but still a great nuisance.


On Aug 26, 2002, smiln32 from Oklahoma City, OK (Zone 7a) wrote:

Also known as "biddy biddy", though I have yet to determine why. :) This plant is not native to the U.S. Groundcover.