Houndstongue
Cynoglossum officinale

Family: Boraginaceae
Genus: Cynoglossum (SIGH-no-gloss-um) (Info)
Species: officinale (oh-fiss-ih-NAH-lee) (Info)

Category:

Biennials

Herbs

Height:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Spacing:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

All parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Scarlet (Dark Red)

Bloom Time:

Mid Summer

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Other details:

May be a noxious weed or invasive

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

7.9 to 8.5 (alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

,

Grand Rapids, Michigan

Belfield, North Dakota

Tremonton, Utah

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
0
neutrals
2
negatives
RatingContent
Negative

On May 24, 2014, bahngarten from Yachats, OR wrote:

I saw this plant in SE Oregon last week near Page Springs, where it was growing and blooming happily along the roadside in a disturbed area. I would guess it could be invasive.
It is not native.

Negative

On Mar 15, 2007, Joan from Belfield, ND (Zone 4a) wrote:

This plant was just recently declared a noxious weed in our county.

Houndstongue grows in ranges, pastures, and roadsides, and is toxic to horses and cattle. The weed contains alkaloids that may cause liver cells to stop reproducing.

It reproduces by seeds and appears as a leafy rosette in its first year. The stem is erect, stout, heavy, 1-1/2 to 3 feet high, usually branched above. The leaves are alternate, the basal and lower ones are broad, and are oblong to lance-shaped. The upper leaves are narrower and pointed, almost clasping. The flowers are terminal and reddish-purple in color. The fruit consists of four nutlets (seeds), each about 1/3 inch long, with the outer surface covered with short, barbed prickles. Nutlets break apart at maturity and are rap... read more