Arrow-arum
Peltandra virginica

Family: Araceae (a-RAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Peltandra (pelt-AN-dra) (Info)
Species: virginica (vir-JIN-ih-kuh) (Info)
Synonym:Peltandra undulata

Category:

Ponds and Aquatics

Height:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Spacing:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Handling plant may cause skin irritation or allergic reaction

Bloom Color:

Pale Yellow

Green

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Foliage:

Deciduous

Herbaceous

Smooth-Textured

Other details:

May be a noxious weed or invasive

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Tuskegee, Alabama

Chicago, Illinois

Annapolis, Maryland

Centreville, Maryland

Roslindale, Massachusetts

Reston, Virginia

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
2
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Mar 1, 2014, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote:

A bog plant/water marginal with attractive arrow-shaped foliage. Plants may be genetically variable in size/leaf shape. Usually looks superficially like an arrowhead (Sagittaria), but Peltandra is more shade tolerant and lacks showy flowers.

Flowers are ornamentally insignificant.

Native to the easter half of North America. This can sometimes be an aggressive plant, though usually less aggressive than Sagittaria latifolia. Can be invasive outside its native range.

As with almost all aroids, all parts of this plant are toxic if ingested.

Neutral

On Oct 25, 2006, Peter_Paul from Reston, VA (Zone 7a) wrote:

Peltandra virginica, as may be expected, grows wild here in northern Virginia, in marshlands and along canals & reservoirs. Usually seen in sites where it has a few inches of water over the crown. Emerges in May, collapses & withers in October. A big bold plant when mature, but does not appear to spread aggressively - would make a nice feature plant for a large wildlife garden pond.

Neutral

On Oct 7, 2004, tcfromky from Mercer, PA (Zone 5a) wrote:

The plant name, when translated, means: Peltandra: from pelte for "small shield" and aner for "stamen", referring to shape of stamen - virginica: of Virginia.