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PlantFiles: Angel Trumpet, Angel's Trumpet
Brugmansia x insignis 'Pink'

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Family: Solanaceae (so-lan-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Brugmansia (broog-MAN-zee-ah) (Info)
Species: x insignis
Cultivar: Pink

» View all varieties of Brugmansias

3 vendors have this plant for sale.

7 members have or want this plant for trade.

Height:
10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)
12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)
15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

Spacing:
4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

Hardiness:
USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)
USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)
USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)
USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)
USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:
Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:
All parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:
Pale Pink

Bloom Time:
Late Winter/Early Spring
Mid Spring
Late Spring/Early Summer
Mid Summer
Late Summer/Early Fall
Mid Fall
Late Fall/Early Winter

Foliage:
Smooth-Textured

Other details:
This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds
Flowers are fragrant

Soil pH requirements:
6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)
6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)
7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:
Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:
From woody stem cuttings
From softwood cuttings
From semi-hardwood cuttings
From hardwood cuttings
From seed; sow indoors before last frost
By air layering

Seed Collecting:
Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

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to view:

By Georgiaredclay
Thumbnail #1 of Brugmansia x insignis by Georgiaredclay

By snowhermit
Thumbnail #2 of Brugmansia x insignis by snowhermit

By Calalily
Thumbnail #3 of Brugmansia x insignis by Calalily

By Abutilon
Thumbnail #4 of Brugmansia x insignis by Abutilon

By Abutilon
Thumbnail #5 of Brugmansia x insignis by Abutilon

By Abutilon
Thumbnail #6 of Brugmansia x insignis by Abutilon

By Happenstance
Thumbnail #7 of Brugmansia x insignis by Happenstance

There are a total of 11 photos.
Click here to view them all!

Profile:

4 positives
No neutrals
No negatives

Gardeners' Notes:

RatingAuthorContent
Positive prickersnall On Nov 26, 2012, prickersnall from Madison, WI wrote:

I have seen many such LOOKING plants in Wisconsin, but I always thought they were Datura I was looking at.

Does anyone know the differentce between Brugmansia and Datura ? They both look like impressive plants. Also..do brugmansias always hang face-down ?

Positive Sashprd58 On Apr 29, 2008, Sashprd58 from Manchester, CT wrote:

I have grown these plants for many years in CT and they do very well. I cut the stem down in the late fall and put them in my unheated garage until spring. When weather allows, I bring them outside and begin watering and they quickly send up leaves. They will be blooming in a short period of time. I have 1 white and 1 purple & white flower but am looking for a pretty yellow. I started them from seed (inside) and they bloomed profusely the first year.

Positive RxBenson On Jun 27, 2004, RxBenson from Pikesville, MD (Zone 7a) wrote:

My plant from Logee's Greenhouses in CT arrived in late spring in 2003 and very quickly set about growing and budding -- flowering before it was even 18-in tall!

It is now 5-ft tall, with three main trunks/stalks and is in bloom here in coastal NJ on 6-27-04. I attempted to keep it in slow-growth during last winter in my south-facing sun room, but I could never seem to keep a jump ahead of the whiteflies despite the successes I have with Neem oil. It would drop all of its magnificent leaves! (I spray too late instead of maintaining a biweekly schedule -- bad me!) So I moved it into a cool low-light back bedroom along with B. versicolor and kept them both pretty dry and leafless. In late May I moved both tubs outside into partial shade and they took off! (And I'm spraying religiously now!) I am also maintaining a bi-weekly regimen of bloom food.

This summer we are having really high winds on sunny days and I have to soak the tubs sometimes twice a day.

X insigna blooms here in mid-June and then takes a midsummer break before its lesser fall show. I haven't had any seed pods on it as yet.

Thrips are a problem, sometimes even eating large holes in the blooms -- by dark of night. I go out with a flashlight and crush the little (expletive deleted) beasts with my fingers.

Cuttings seem to take longer to root in water (in a dark glass because roots are photophobic) then do other varieities I grow.

Positive meiyu On Aug 13, 2002, meiyu from san antonio, TX (Zone 8a) wrote:

I'm not sure if this is the one that I have, but from the picture, it could be the same. Her flowerbuds are yellow, turning pale pink as they blossom, and are lightly fragrant. The blossoms droop downward at about a 45 degree angle, unlike my deep yellow angel's trumpets who face perpendicular to the ground. My ph is neutral, just between 6.5 and 7, and she gets full sun until 1-2 pm, and she seems to like SuperBloom every payday (bi-monthly). I have her sharing the surrounding area with a couple of plumerias, a parrot flower, some african iris', a daylilly, a hibiscus, and some dwarf balloon flowers along the border. I just planted them in May from small stem pieces I snapped off plants that were growing in the San Antonio area public gardens (back in February or March...I've had them held captive in a vase until I moved into my new house and had a raised bed built for them), and already I have had to cut branches and new stalks away to keep it down to a 4' tree (which all of my friends have appreciated, and many of which I am holding once again in a vase until I build some more raised beds for more)!! It's been blooming since late June, but it may have bloomed earlier, had it been big enough to hold the flower. Until recently, her leaves were a beautiful deep green, and so flawless, one may wonder whether it was really alive or imitation, however; since I've had to cut it back almost every other day, or thin out some of the huge 15"-long leaves from the larger stalks (since all the plants in that bed require that she share some of this Texas sun with them), she's been getting a little yellow. Still growing like a weed, her yellowing leaves are a bit confusing.

Regional...

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Auburn, Alabama
Tuscaloosa, Alabama
Alameda, California
Clayton, California
Highgrove, California
Central Manchester, Connecticut
Bradenton, Florida
Brandon, Florida
Saint Paul, Minnesota
Springfield, Missouri
Dallas, North Carolina
Pocahontas, Tennessee
Houston, Texas (2 reports)



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