French Filet 'Helda'

Phaseolus vulgaris

Family: Papilionaceae (pa-pil-ee-uh-NAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Phaseolus (FAZ-ee-oh-lus) (Info)
Species: vulgaris (vul-GAIR-iss) (Info)
Cultivar: Helda
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Category:

Annuals

Vegetables

Height:

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

Spacing:

6-9 in. (15-22 cm)

Seed Type:

Open Pollinated

Growth Habit:

Climbing

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

N/A

Days to Maturity:

61 to 70 days

71 to 80 days

Bloom Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

,

Waynesboro, Mississippi

Morgantown, West Virginia

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
2
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Feb 9, 2016, lokidog from Logan, UT wrote:

This is NOT a French filet bean. In the UK these are called French beans to distinguish them from runner (Scarlet runner here in the US) and I think that's how the mistake was made. French filet beans are narrow, and round in cross section. These are 'romano' types or large, flattened (in cross section) beans.

Positive

On Dec 12, 2012, goulot from Canton, MI wrote:

I have grown Helda in Michigan for two year already, and I definitely prefer it to Fortex, Kentucky Wonder and Kentucky Blue: better taste, larger yields.

I would also add that Japanese beetles seemed to go for Fortex before attacking Helda. But, lacking Fortex, they made do with Helda. I used Neem Oil a couple of times; it worked. Note, however, that Japanese beetles eat the leaves, not the beans; that way, we can coexist peacefully.

Neutral

On Aug 23, 2005, Farmerdill from Augusta, GA (Zone 8a) wrote:

A pole Romano type. This vining plant reaches 8 feet tall and up to 3 feet wide, with enormous crops that begin in early summer. The flattish pods are 9 inches long and very weighty, loaded down with plump white seeds. Great resistance to Common Bean Mosaic ensures even bigger, healthier crops, too.

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