Photo by Melody

PlantFiles: Stalked Bulbine, Orange Bulbine
Bulbine frutescens

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Family: Asphodelaceae (as-foh-del-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Bulbine (BUL-bin-ee) (Info)
Species: frutescens (froo-TESS-enz) (Info)

Synonym:Bulbine caulescens

One vendor has this plant for sale.

25 members have or want this plant for trade.

Category:
Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Height:
18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Spacing:
6-9 in. (15-22 cm)

Hardiness:
USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)
USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)
USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)
USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)
USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:
Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:
Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:
Orange
Gold (Yellow-Orange)

Bloom Time:
Late Spring/Early Summer

Foliage:
Grown for foliage
Evergreen
Blue-Green
Smooth-Textured

Other details:
Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:
6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)
6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)
7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:
Non-patented

Propagation Methods:
By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)
From herbaceous stem cuttings

Seed Collecting:
Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

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By Biddy
Thumbnail #1 of Bulbine frutescens by Biddy

By Wingnut
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By dtroost
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By htop
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There are a total of 30 photos.
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Profile:

16 positives
No neutrals
No negatives

Gardeners' Notes:

RatingAuthorContent
Positive madeofstarstuff On Mar 20, 2014, madeofstarstuff from Cinco Bayou, FL wrote:

We had the worst winter in about 20 years over here in Fort Walton Beach, FL this January. We even had snow! It got down to 16 degrees Fahrenheit one night.

The orange bulbine that I had planted the previous summer turned brown after our cold night, and some died. But some clung on to life with a few green leaves. Now, only two months later, they are growing back with a vengeance and I saw a flower starting to come up yesterday! I will definitely be dividing the survivors once they are larger.

I'm looking forward to seeing how they will survive a normal 8b winter.

Positive mekos On Nov 2, 2010, mekos from Fair Play, SC (Zone 7b) wrote:

I grow this as a house plant and love it.

Positive hardyinokc On May 20, 2010, hardyinokc from Oklahoma City, OK wrote:

After a severe winter season, I was totally surprised to find that my bulbine survived the winter planted in the ground. The bed was mulched with 4-6" of straw over the winter. I noticed this week that it is coming back from the roots.

Positive RioRosie On Oct 13, 2009, RioRosie from Harlingen, TX wrote:

I had a corner of my yard that I thought was cursed. Nothing would grow there.
This area of the yard gets full, blazing hot sun for 8-10 hours of the day in Deep South Texas (10 miles from the US-Mexico border).
I finally bought a couple bulbine and put them into the ground, watered them with some Miracle Gro. Within days, they started sending up flowers. They took hold and are just beautiful after only a few weeks, continually sending up more and more flowers.
I haven't done anything special with them: they're out there, baking in the relentless heat and are filling in very nicely. I water a couple times a week, unless it rains.
Buoyed by my success, I bought two more bulbine and planted them in my neighbor-lady's garden. (She has terrible luck with all plants and her yard was looking very sparse.) The bulbine are thriving in her yard with almost no attention.
We now have hummingbirds regularly visiting the yard--they move from the bulbine to the hibiscus. Such a treat!
Great plant!

Positive flaflwrgrl On Jul 5, 2009, flaflwrgrl from North Central , FL (Zone 8b) wrote:

Have it in the hot sun, full sun for 8 or 9 hours per day, grows like rip, blooms nearly all year, tolerates drought like nobody's business. Bees love it, so do butterflies and I do too!

Positive jaiben On May 20, 2009, jaiben from Dallas, TX wrote:

I love this plant because it takes care of itself, with little attention from a nongardener. I have a Bulbine grouping under a redbud tree in my front yard in Dallas, and it does well with dappled sunlight.

Positive rivermama On May 6, 2009, rivermama from Perry, OK wrote:

I bought two of these while visiting Texas last week. As soon as I put them on the patio, hummingbirds began to visit them. I'm always looking for plants that hummingbirds like and bulbine fits the bill.

Positive Bulbifan On Jun 9, 2008, Bulbifan from Roodepoort
South Africa wrote:

Easy grower. Grows in South Africa and used by traditional healers as a face beautifier and for cracked lips in winter. My own experience: It is an excelent treatment for the following... Insect bites and stings (bees and mosquitos), sunburn, bleeding stopper, skin rasches, and a lady with facial skin cancer can testify that her cancer has gone since using the sap on her face. I saw it and she retained no marks afterwards. I have had it in my garden for 3 years, and will keep it as long as I live. If you mix the sap with Aquous cream, you can take it with you on holiday.

Positive ogrejelly On Mar 16, 2008, ogrejelly from Gilbert, AZ (Zone 9b) wrote:

This beauty did so well in the Phoenix area until the dead of summer when it just cooked. It almost made it through the sumemr but it was just too hot in the full sun all day. I just bought another and will place him in partial shade to try again. I hope it works as this was one of my favorites.

The other cool thing is that this plant can work in a variety of landscapes.

Positive Stuber On Aug 3, 2005, Stuber from Fernandina Beach, FL wrote:

Grows well here in N. Florida (8b-9a) and readily available in garden centers, flea markets, farmers markets, etc. None I've seen flower as heavily as in some of the attached photos, however, and they tend to get a bit "leggy" looking in these parts at times. May be a function of the higher humidity and rainfall we experience than Texas and other areas where it appears to be quite popular.

Positive vossner On May 9, 2005, vossner from Richmond, TX (Zone 9a) wrote:

this is a great low-maintenance plant. I have mine potted have not had opportunity to divide as of this posting.

Positive sterhill On Mar 13, 2005, sterhill from Atlanta, GA (Zone 7b) wrote:

Atlanta - about three years ago, I bought two of these. Planted one and kept the other in a container. The planted one did not make it over the winter and the container one was over wintered the garage. It is now very big and needing repotting. Lovely plant but I think Atlanta was too cold for it to live outside.

Positive Wingnut On Jun 16, 2004, Wingnut from Spicewood, TX (Zone 8b) wrote:

Great little plant, very easy to grow. To propagate, simply break off "plantlets" (sections of the plant made up of three to six green "leaves" ~ look at the closeup pic I posted and it'll be obvious what I'm talking about) and pot them up in free draining soil just to the crown (right below where the "leaves" start turning green). Keep them watered after they dry out.

I have both orange/yellow flowered form and the yellow flowered form. Both are easily propagated this way.

Positive dstartz On Jun 8, 2004, dstartz from Deep South Texas, TX (Zone 9a) wrote:

I love this plant! It is easy to grow, needs virtually no care, makes new plants readily and blooms for months.

I grow this in my container garden and every few months my husband will divide it into several new containers with each filling to the pot's capacity within 3-4 months.

I grow it in dappled shade and water lightly every 3-4 days in the heat of the summer.

Positive htop On Aug 20, 2003, htop from San Antonio, TX (Zone 8b) wrote:

San Antonio, TX
A native of South Africa, the bulbine is commonly called burn jelly plant because the sap in the leaves is used for healing burns,cuts, stings and rashes in the same way an aloe vera is used. Pest and disease free, quite drought resistent (withstanding several weeks without supplemental water if necessary), long bloom time (almost all year), blooms do not fade for a long period, requiring little fertilizer, fast growth, easily propagated, not fussy about soil (except it must be well drained), evergreen (withstood 19 degree weather), likes the heat and showy - what more could one ask for! I am delighted with this plant which should be utilized more.

Tips:
Do not over water, especially in fall and winter.
Give enough room to spread.
Deadhead blooms as they fully dry to encourage new blooms.
Do not over fertilize.
If you have a sunny spot where nothing grows, plant itthere.
"Hallmark" (orange) is more compact than the yellow variety
whose flower spikes tend to fall over in the wind. I like Hallmark best because it is "more tidy".
Be sure to plant deep enough - the dirt should be almost even with the base of the leaves - otherwise the plant will topple over from its own weight. Also, this encourages rooting and spreading of the plant.

Positive Biddy On Feb 5, 2003, Biddy from Cape Town
South Africa wrote:

I bought this plant about 3 months ago. It is in the full sun in a pot it has now overgrown. It has turned about to be one of the most beautiful sights in my garden. It is mid-summer now and it is blooming profusely. The blooms seem to stretch out towards the sun....like a sunflower does!
An easy, water-wise plants with great results.
Love it and recommend it.

Regional...

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

,
Florala, Alabama
Gilbert, Arizona
Phoenix, Arizona
Aliso Viejo, California
Brentwood, California
Carmichael, California
Casa De Oro-mount Helix, California
Clayton, California
Lemoore, California
North Fork, California
San Diego, California
San Jose, California
Atlantis, Florida
Boyette, Florida
Chiefland, Florida
Crystal River, Florida
De Land, Florida
Fernandina Beach, Florida
Hobe Sound, Florida
Holt, Florida
Jacksonville, Florida (2 reports)
Lake City, Florida
Melbourne Beach, Florida
Niceville, Florida
North De Land, Florida
Oakland, Florida
Ocoee, Florida
Palm Coast, Florida (2 reports)
Pebble Creek, Florida
Pensacola, Florida
Port Charlotte, Florida
Siesta Key, Florida
Spring Hill, Florida
Wellborn, Florida
Zephyrhills South, Florida
Kihei, Hawaii
Baton Rouge, Louisiana (2 reports)
Alamogordo, New Mexico
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Fair Play, South Carolina
Alice, Texas
Austin, Texas (3 reports)
Briarcliff, Texas
Dallas, Texas
Deer Park, Texas
Desoto, Texas
Dripping Springs, Texas
Elgin, Texas
Fort Worth, Texas
Haltom City, Texas
Hideaway, Texas
Houston, Texas
Humble, Texas
Mckinney, Texas
New Braunfels, Texas
Palm Valley, Texas
Port Lavaca, Texas
Redwood, Texas
Richmond, Texas
Rockport, Texas
Round Rock, Texas
Royse City, Texas
San Angelo, Texas
San Antonio, Texas
Santa Fe, Texas
Sunset Valley, Texas (2 reports)



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