Hybrid Tea Rose 'Chicago Peace'


Family: Rosaceae (ro-ZAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Rosa (RO-zuh) (Info)
Cultivar: Chicago Peace
Additional cultivar information:(aka JOHnago, PP2037)
Hybridized by Johnston
Registered or introduced: 1962
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Hybrid Tea


4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)


36-48 in. (90-120 cm)


USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Bloom Color:

Pink blend (pb)

Bloom Shape:


Tea shaped

Flower Fragrance:

Slightly Fragrant

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Blooms repeatedly



Patent Information:

Patent expired

Other Details:

Susceptible to black spot

Susceptible to mildew

Stems are moderately thorny

Pruning Instructions:

Blooms on new wood; prune early to promote new growth

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

Propagation Methods:

From softwood cuttings

From semi-hardwood cuttings

From hardwood cuttings

By grafting

By budding

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us


This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:


Huntsville, Alabama

Pansey, Alabama

Willcox, Arizona

Fayetteville, Arkansas

Clayton, California

Fairfield, California

La Jolla, California

Merced, California

San Diego, California

San Dimas, California

San Jose, California

San Leandro, California

Clifton, Colorado

Denver, Colorado

Loveland, Colorado

Bartow, Florida

Miami, Florida

Valdosta, Georgia

Chicago, Illinois

Hampton, Illinois

Washington, Illinois

Kalona, Iowa

Andover, Kansas

Owensboro, Kentucky

Echo, Louisiana

Henderson, Nevada

Auburn, New Hampshire

Hornell, New York

Bucyrus, Ohio

Blanchard, Oklahoma

Ninnekah, Oklahoma

Gresham, Oregon

North Augusta, South Carolina

Crossville, Tennessee

Knoxville, Tennessee

Pocahontas, Tennessee

Austin, Texas

Houston, Texas

Plano, Texas

Red Oak, Texas

Santa Fe, Texas

Mc Lean, Virginia

Sterling, Virginia

Barberton, Washington

Sammamish, Washington

show all

Gardeners' Notes:


On Oct 7, 2014, beginner_rose1 from Valdosta, GA wrote:

I live in South Georgia and am not an agricultural person. I have a single Chicago Peace Rose bush and it has grown from a 6in scraggly twig into a 4ft tall bush with multiple blooms every day. It is my favorite rose by far.


On Apr 10, 2009, Joan from Belfield, ND (Zone 4a) wrote:

Editor's Note

Plant Patent number 2037 has expired


On Aug 16, 2008, iris28 from (dana)Owensboro, KY (Zone 6a) wrote:

i love this rose . it has huge blooms every on has been in perfect form.and the color i so deep and long lasting


On Mar 30, 2008, goofybulb from (Zone 5b) wrote:

It's almost one year since I purchased my Chicago Peace rose from the local HD, in an impulse buy for beauty and fragrance. Soon (in about a week) it started to loose leaves, so I had to figure out why. Turned out that it had black spot. At that time, I had no idea what the criteria for buying a rose are, how a healthy/sick rose looks, etc. I battled the nasty stuff for almost two months until I really got it under control (can I say cure?). It went thru the whole hot and humid summer blooming, and continued to bloom till this day.
Now I can say that, among all roses that I have, it is definitely the healthiest, most resistant and strongest of all. I think I had one blind shot since I brought it back to health! To me, it means a lot!
It also rooted easily here, in Miami (one... read more


On Mar 20, 2007, Tinyeic from Henderson, NV wrote:

When I lived in Las Vegas, NV, a neighbor was removing all the roses from his yard. Another neighbor and I were horrified so we took some. Of all, The Chicago Peace was so beautiful with large blooms and such a variety of color as the weather changed from hot to cool. When I moved, I was sad that I couldn't take it with me and after two years, I saw a bush in a local store and it's beauty is gracing my flower bed once more.


On Jun 8, 2006, TiggerOR from Saint Helens, OR (Zone 8a) wrote:

Our rose bed was augmented and transplanted last year, with varying success. Most of our roses did just fine. Our shining example of this is Chicago Peace. It's grown vigorously this season, and the blooms are enormous, not to mention beautiful.


On Mar 20, 2006, Barbc from Gresham, OR wrote:

This rose is a charmer. The soft colors, the fragrance, and the relative easy care made it one of my favorites. It is hardy in this growing zone. Barbc


On Mar 18, 2006, ColoradoSun from Clifton, CO wrote:

This was one of the first roses I ever planted, and at the time I had no idea what I was doing. In the first couple of years it went without any pruning, feeding, and sometimes even watering and still bloomed beautifully. It will always be a favorite of mine.


On Jun 5, 2005, Gindee77 from Hampton, IL (Zone 5a) wrote:

This is one of the most photogenic roses there is. It's blooms are a carnival of colors and have a wonderful hybrid tea form.


On Dec 31, 2003, Colorado_Roseman from Loveland, CO (Zone 5a) wrote:

This rose has been a favorite for many years in my Grandmothers and Mothers rose beds. I have one in my rose beds now and she is a wonderful bloomer. The variations in each bloom help add to her beauty and mystery. Very winter hardy here in the Berthoud and Loveland, Colorado areas. No disease problems at all with this one.


On Jul 11, 2003, marybab wrote:

This plant was lovely the first year, blooming july thru august, but did not make it through the winter (Jefferson County, Colorado - zone 4. Graft was 2 inches below soil level. It has surfaced this year as a lone cane, about 4 feet high, flowerless, wild. I'm going to wait and see if the parent plant can do anything interesting before I dig it up.