Sweet Corn
Zea mays 'Black Aztec'

Family: Poaceae (poh-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Zea (ZEE-uh) (Info)
Species: mays (maze) (Info)
Cultivar: Black Aztec
» View all varieties of Corn

Category:

Vegetables

Height:

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

Spacing:

6-9 in. (15-22 cm)

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

Seed Type:

Open Pollinated

Days to Maturity:

101 to 110 days

Kernel Color:

Dark Purple/Black

Soil pH requirements:

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Shawnee Mission, Kansas

Barnum, Minnesota

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
3
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Feb 26, 2015, gbw from Barnum, MN wrote:

This corn does well in my climate (Zone 3, MN) and matures quickly. The immature corn is good roasted or steamed although not as sickeningly sweet as sugar enhanced corns. That to me is a plus for Black Aztec.

As for using the mature corn for corn meal, something widely and wildly touted in catalogs and all over the internet, forget it. This is a sweet corn and has very little soft or hard starch. Corn bread bread from Black Aztec or any sweet corn is gummy. It can be mixed with corn meal from flour corn or flint corn at a ratio of 2 parts corn meal and one part sweet corn meal. Doing so reduces the need for flour in the recipe and makes the bread taste sweeter.

This is, as far as I can find out, not really a Mexican corn variety. It is probably derived from s... read more

Positive

On Feb 26, 2015, gbw from Barnum, MN wrote:

This corn does well in my climate (Zone 3, MN) and matures quickly. The immature corn is good roasted or steamed although not as sickeningly sweet as sugar enhanced corns. That to me is a plus for Black Aztec.

As for using the mature corn for corn meal, something widely and wildly touted in catalogs and all over the internet, forget it. This is a sweet corn and has very little soft or hard starch. Corn bread bread from Black Aztec or any sweet corn is gummy. It can be mixed with corn meal from flour corn or flint corn at a ratio of 2 parts corn meal and one part sweet corn meal. Doing so reduces the need for flour in the recipe and makes the bread taste sweeter.

This is, as far as I can find out, not really a Mexican corn variety. It is probably derived from s... read more

Neutral

On Apr 8, 2011, turtleheart from Wexford, PA wrote:

the variety is in fact a seneca strain from the northeast that was marketed with "exotic" labeling with the intentions to boost sales. ive seen it sold as a sweet corn, and a flour corn, and my impression from seeing different photos from various grow outs is it seems to be a mixture of at least 2 seneca varieties, one flour, one sweet. my calico flour is seneca, katie wheeler and darwin john, and there are black ears here and there. maybe it is related.

Neutral

On Jan 29, 2006, melody from Benton, KY (Zone 7a) wrote:

Information only, I have not grown this variety.

This corn has been grown for hundreds of years, but was first commercially marketed in the 1860's.

The young ears make good roasting ears, but grinding the dried kernals to cornmeal was the primary use for this corn.

plants frow 5' to6' tall and harvest in 70 to 85 days.

Neutral

On Nov 8, 2004, smiln32 from Oklahoma City, OK (Zone 7a) wrote:

This variety of corn is said to be "sweet", but when compared to our newer varieties, it's probably not especially sweet. I read that it may have been grown since pre-Columbian times. The ears of Black Aztec are long and slender and turn deep blue-black when mature.

Can be made into corn meal also.