Cut Leaf Coneflower
Rudbeckia laciniata

Family: Asteraceae (ass-ter-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Rudbeckia (rud-BEK-ee-a) (Info)
Species: laciniata (la-sin-ee-AY-tuh) (Info)
View this plant in a garden

Category:

Perennials

Height:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

Spacing:

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Pale Yellow

Pale Green

Bloom Time:

Late Summer/Early Fall

Foliage:

Bronze-Green

Smooth-Textured

Other details:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Self-sows freely; deadhead if you do not want volunteer seedlings next season

Soil pH requirements:

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Vincent, Alabama

Flagstaff, Arizona

Lula, Georgia

Geneva, Illinois

Iowa City, Iowa

Westminster, Maryland

Midland, Michigan

Pinconning, Michigan

Minneapolis, Minnesota

Elsberry, Missouri

Frenchtown, New Jersey

Kure Beach, North Carolina

Salem, Oregon

Media, Pennsylvania

Valencia, Pennsylvania

West Chester, Pennsylvania

Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania

Okatie, South Carolina

Arlington, Tennessee

Newport News, Virginia

Vienna, Virginia

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Gardeners' Notes:

3
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Feb 6, 2014, Rickwebb from Downingtown, PA wrote:

A good-looking native perennial that I have seen wild in a few spots in se Pennsylvania in colonies and also planted as colonies at land preserves to showcase native plants. It gets very tall and can lean over, so it needs room and is best as a group. Good for pollinators. Like with other tall perennials, in a garden one can cut it way back in spring to keep it shorter and more stocky.

Positive

On Mar 22, 2006, Malus2006 from Coon Rapids, MN (Zone 4a) wrote:

This is a vigorous tall plant, often taller than I am (at 5 feet 11 inches) It have suprising shade tolerant but prefer part shade at woodland edge. It blooms rather heavily, even when you cut it back. It is one of the last flowers to bloom, just before some variety of asters. It multiply like crazy, but I have not seen any seedlings. It have a tight group of basal leaves then suddenly send up stems sparely laced with leaves up to six to eight feet before blooming. May dislike dry soil. Bees seem to loves it, but so does a kind of aphid that often infects asters and other coneflowers. The aphids is bold red in color and there seem to be no predators willing to eat them. Often my hands are stained red after crushing them!

Positive

On Jul 29, 2005, paste592 from Westminster, MD (Zone 6b) wrote:

This is not a plant that I would move into the perennial bed -- it's quite tall, and the blossoms are more acid-yellow than I like for blending. However, for the edges of the woods, they are nice -- before they bloom, the foliage isn't really gangly as you might expect, and the blossoms are plentiful and small in relation to the plant's height. Mine were a gift from another MG, and I'm hoping they multiply quickly (as they are said to reseed readily) -- I could use 50 more!!