Fuchsia
Fuchsia 'Lottie Hobby'

Family: Onagraceae (on-uh-GRAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Fuchsia (FEW-she-uh) (Info)
Cultivar: Lottie Hobby
Hybridized by Edwards
Registered or introduced: 1839
» View all varieties of Fuchsias

Category:

Shrubs

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Height:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Spacing:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Rose/Mauve

Fuchsia (Red-Purple)

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Mid Fall

Blooms repeatedly

Foliage:

Deciduous

Smooth-Textured

Other details:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From softwood cuttings

From semi-hardwood cuttings

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Amesti, California

Waterford, California

Snellville, Georgia

Salem, Oregon

West Linn, Oregon

Chimacum, Washington

Fircrest, Washington

Seattle, Washington

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Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jan 30, 2011, PedricksCorner from Freedom, CA (Zone 9b) wrote:

I am very impressed with this hardy upright fuchsia. The flowers might be tiny, but they are abundant all year round. It is currently January 30, 2011 and it is in bloom. It has a nice dense growth habit and has become a large bush in less than two years since the cuttings arrived.

Neutral

On Aug 31, 2002, Baa wrote:

A very bushy and floriferous cultivar bred by a Mr Edwards in Great Britian, 1839.

It has tiny crimson pink flowers on a smallish bush with equally tiny leaves (under 1/4 inch). The stems are quite thin, reddish and easy to train to a shape or bonsai. The flowers are followed by tiny black berries.

This Fuchsia is an Encliandra type cultivar from Central America. The Encliandras (a group of about 5 or 6 species) live at a high altitude, which means they are hardier than many Fuchsias and tolerate drier conditions.