Fritillary, Fritillaria

Fritillaria unibracteata

Family: Liliaceae (lil-ee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Fritillaria (frit-il-AR-ee-uh) (Info)
Species: unibracteata (yoo-nee-brak-tee-AY-tuh) (Info)
Synonym:Fritillaria unibracteata var. unibracteata
Synonym:Fritillaria lixianensis
Synonym:Fritillaria sulcisquamosa
Synonym:Fritillaria unibracteata var. ganziensis
Synonym:Fritillaria unibracteata var. maculata

Category:

Bulbs

Foliage Color:

Blue-Green

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Grow outdoors year-round

Height:

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Spacing:

6-9 in. (15-22 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Light Shade

Danger:

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Highland, Michigan

Warwick, Rhode Island

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jul 8, 2017, wallacegal from Highland, MI (Zone 5a) wrote:

I have this plant growing in one of my flower beds. It gets light shade in the morning and then sun most of the day. When we moved here, I had only one growing the first year. After it had yellowed, I cut the plant back. The following year, after it yellowed, I let it dry out and let the tiny seeds fall. This year, I have two growing so you can grow them from seeds rather than just corms, but they obviously germinated slowly.

They grow quite tall and start out with one giant 'flower head' that dries out and falls away like paper releasing the smaller flowers inside. As those bloom, they droop. A beautiful, striking plant.

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