Blue Marble Tree, Quondong, Blue Quondong

Elaeocarpus angustifolius

Family: Elaeocarpaceae
Genus: Elaeocarpus (el-lee-oh-KAR-pus) (Info)
Species: angustifolius (an-gus-tee-FOH-lee-us) (Info)
Synonym:Elaeocarpus grandis
Synonym:Elaeocarpus parkinsonii

Category:

Edible Fruits and Nuts

Trees

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

over 40 ft. (12 m)

Spacing:

Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Inconspicuous/none

Bloom Time:

Unknown - Tell us

Foliage:

Unknown - Tell us

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Mulberry, Florida

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
3
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Jul 1, 2014, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

Grown in Hawaii sometimes where it is an invasive now.

Neutral

On Nov 10, 2009, Tagetespatula from Brisbane,
Australia wrote:

Elaeocarpus angustifolius syn grandis "Blue Quandong", is a native to Queensland. Is a large evergreen tree with open branches and a layered crown, clustered alternate leaves with a crenate - entire margin not rarely undulate, with Racemes of cream/ white flowers to 18mm flowering in summer. The fruits are blue, glabose and up to 3cm in diameter, found in rainforests and along the banks of streams. It prefers a moist, fairly fertile soil with a position
in full sun or part-shade,and is not drought tolerant.
Prefers a neutral to acidic pH and is not suitable for standard back yards.

Tagetespatula ;-)

Neutral

On Sep 23, 2002, iceman from Townsville/Queensland,
Australia wrote:

found at townsville,QLD Australia. native to area, think it could be the same as E grandis?

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