Asclepias Species, Spider Milkweed, Antelope Horns

Asclepias asperula

Family: Apocynaceae (a-pos-ih-NAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Asclepias (ass-KLE-pee-us) (Info)
Species: asperula (as-PAIR-uh-luh) (Info)
Synonym:Asclepias asperula
Synonym:Asclepiodora asperula

Category:

Perennials

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Water Requirements:

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Spacing:

12-15 in. (30-38 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Pale Green

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Other details:

May be a noxious weed or invasive

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; stratify if sowing indoors

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

,

Ada, Oklahoma

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Abilene, Texas

Arlington, Texas

Austin, Texas (4 reports)

Brownwood, Texas

Crawford, Texas

De Leon, Texas

Dripping Springs, Texas

Fort Worth, Texas

Granbury, Texas

Helotes, Texas

Pasadena, Texas

Leesburg, Virginia

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

5
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Oct 27, 2010, lolsuz from Austin, TX wrote:

Being a newcomer to Texas, I had never seen this plant before spotting it this past spring, in the pasture next to the property that now is my home (north Austin). It's a fascinating plant; so very different than anything I'd ever seen.

Positive

On Mar 21, 2009, eatmyplants from Comanche county, TX (Zone 8a) wrote:

Many native plants don't appear in my area unless we've had sufficient winter and spring rains, but asclepias is always dependable, but somewhat less during dry years.

Positive

On Apr 27, 2007, sybiljane from Dripping Springs, TX wrote:

This plant is an important food for Monarch and Queen butterfly caterpillars. We live in the Texas Hill Country and this plant is abundant on our property. If you take a closer look you will always find a caterpillar on the plant.

Positive

On Nov 30, 2006, frostweed from Josephine, Arlington, TX (Zone 8a) wrote:

Spider Milkweed, Antelope Horns Asclepias asperula is native to Texas and other States.

Positive

On Apr 25, 2006, TEMBELLE from Temple, TX wrote:

My soil is Blackland Prairie; alkaline. This beautiful plant grows wild in my back 1/2 acre as a native wildflower. Am trying to establish it "up front" in my garden. Very pretty in bloom. Monarch attractant!

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