Paintbrush, Florida Paint Brush, Coastalplain Chaffhead
Carphephorus corymbosus

Family: Asteraceae (ass-ter-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Carphephorus (kar-fey-FOR-us) (Info)
Species: corymbosus (kor-rim-BOW-sus) (Info)

Category:

Perennials

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Water Requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Spacing:

6-9 in. (15-22 cm)

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Pink

Violet/Lavender

Bloom Time:

Late Summer/Early Fall

Mid Fall

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Apopka, Florida

Archer, Florida

Deland, Florida

Hollywood, Florida

Leesburg, Florida

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Oct 21, 2006, phmoeller from Leesburg, FL (Zone 9b) wrote:

It is October 21, 2006 and 4 plants are in full bloom in the butterfly garden in the meadows of PEAR Park next to me. The Gulf Fritillary butterflies prefer this over all other nectar souces by a wide margin. I counted 12 Fritillaries at one time on just these 4 plants. The plant should be rather striking in a garden with more dense foliage plants in front of it. It is doing very well in a xeriscape environment.

Positive

On Jan 9, 2003, ButterflyGardnr from Orlando, FL (Zone 9b) wrote:

This showy plant is a great nectar source for butterflies. It starts as a basal rosette. A single bloom spike emerges in the late summer. The clusters of lavendar flowers are very striking large groupings, especially in open meadows mixed in with native grasses. Plants spread slowly by seed.