Purple Stem Angelica, Common Angelica, Great Angelica, Alexanders
Angelica atropurpurea

Family: Apiaceae (ay-pee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Angelica (an-JEL-ee-kuh) (Info)
Species: atropurpurea (at-ro-pur-PURR-ee-uh) (Info)

Category:

Herbs

Perennials

Height:

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

Spacing:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Handling plant may cause skin irritation or allergic reaction

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Aromatic

Other details:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

This plant may be considered a protected species; check before digging or gathering seeds

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; stratify if sowing indoors

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Seed does not store well; sow as soon as possible

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Gaylordsville, Connecticut

Southfield, Michigan

Binghamton, New York

Granville, Ohio

Port Angeles, Washington

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Oct 5, 2006, Sherlock_Holmes from Rife, PA (Zone 6a) wrote:

"Edible Wild Plants of Eastern North America" by Fernald & Kinsey has this to say about Angelica.

"The common northern Angelica has the same uses as the Old World species and from colonial days has been popular, especially through its candied roots and young shoots, which after thorough boiling, are again boiled in sugar and allowed to cool. The tender, new stems and leaf-stalks when peeled are relished by many as a salad, but they have a rather strong flavor which is removed by boiling in two waters, when the cooked vegetable strongly suggests stewed celery.

The very similar European species has long had the same uses."