Episcia, Flame Violet 'Pink Panther'

Episcia cupreata

Family: Gesneriaceae (ges-ner-ee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Episcia (ee-PISH-ee-ah) (Info)
Species: cupreata (kew-pree-AH-tuh) (Info)
Cultivar: Pink Panther
Synonym:Achimenes cupreata


Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Foliage Color:


Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

This plant is suitable for growing indoors


6-12 in. (15-30 cm)


Unknown - Tell us


USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Partial to Full Shade



Bloom Color:


Bloom Time:

Blooms repeatedly




Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:


Propagation Methods:

From softwood cuttings

By simple layering

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed


This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:


Homestead, Florida

Youngsville, Louisiana

Atwater, Ohio

Gardeners' Notes:


On Jun 28, 2004, CaptMicha from Brookeville, MD (Zone 7a) wrote:

Leaves are fuzzy and glossy. Foliage alone makes this plant worth growing. The flowers are quite large and showy. In happy conditons, the plant will develope buds all over the plant and bloom non-stop for a long length of time.

Filtered light, constantly moist soil, water from bottom but don't let it sit in water for any lenth of time. Temps from 70-76 degrees seem to be ideal. Plants appreciate slight humidity but don't require it. Mine do fine and we have a significant lack of humidity.


On Jun 16, 2003, Ivywms from Atwater, OH wrote:

I first saw this plant at our local library, growing all over the book shelves. It was handed down from the grandmother of one of the employees. Anyone asking could have a plantlet.

Mine seems to like the southeast window, shaded by a tree in the afternoon. The library plants (floresent lighting) were
much paler and no blooms. Mine now has much richer color in the leaves and blooms continually, bright red flowers.


On Apr 6, 2003, docora from Medicine Park, OK wrote:

I have had this type plant and its offspring for many years, buying all that come to our local shops which has been few (2-4). In my readings they are considered a rare houseplant; another coloration is/was "chocolate soldier" in those green house cards popular many years ago.

A kiss of east sun seems to keep mine blooming, the leaves also get larger and darker. I use water soluable fertilizer to keep its flowers pink otherwise they tend to be orange. I also use a very good potting soil that is soft/spongy. My plant is now 39 inches long from the edge of the pot to the tip of the longest branch.

As for startings, just take a slip, root in water or plant, or layer in good soil, much easier than Africian Violets. I had mine outside one summer and the leave... read more