White Sandalwood, Chandana

Santalum album

Family: Santalaceae
Genus: Santalum (SAN-tal-um) (Info)
Species: album (AL-bum) (Info)
Synonym:Breynia album

Category:

Trees

Parasites and Hemiparasites

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

Spacing:

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Purple

Inconspicuous/none

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Late Fall/Early Winter

Foliage:

Evergreen

Smooth-Textured

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From semi-hardwood cuttings

From seed; direct sow after last frost

By air layering

Seed Collecting:

Remove fleshy coating on seeds before storing

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen; clean and dry seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Sep 25, 2004, trugger from Mackay,
Australia wrote:

Santalum album is a hemi-parasite, which means that it must parasitize the roots of other plants to be successful.
It preferrs to be grown alongside leguminous plants such as Acacias, Casuarinas or any other leguminous tree or shrub.

Sesbania formosa is an ideal intermediate host which it will eventually kill in around 3 to 5 years. This gives its long term host time to establish. Plant spacings are; Intermediate host/sandalwood at 0.5metre and these pairs 3.0m spacing along a row. Long term host such as Pterocarpus indicus planted in between these. Row spacings are 4.0 metres.

Do not plant within 25 metres of plants you do not want held back. It will eventually kill citrus trees.It is mainly grown for the valuable oil which is extracted from the heart... read more

Positive

On Mar 7, 2003, Dinu from Mysore,
India (Zone 10a) wrote:

Native to the southern regions of India, growing best on dry, stony, but fertile soils. Other species widely scattered from the Malay Archipelago to Australia and the Pacific islands including Hawaii. A small tree up to about 25 to 40 ft in height, with trunk diameters usually 4 to 6 in. Heartwood light yellowish brown when freshly cut, turning dark brown on exposure, and with further aging, to a dark reddish brown; sapwood whitish. Texture very fine and even; grain straight, sometimes wavy; dull to somewhat lustrous, with oily feel; heartwood with a strong fragrant scent that persists, without characteristic taste.

The little berries are a favourite to birds and the flowers are purplish and nearly inconspicuous.


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